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    Dharma Mati, the Rigpa Center in Berlin, Germany
    June 4, 2014


    His Holiness’ black Mercedes drove slowly down the tree-lined Soor Street to a welcoming crowd waiting in front of the German Rigpa Center, Dharma Mati. Colorful katas added a brightness to the greenery and the traditional red brick, arched façade of the elegant building. His Holiness stopped to greet a few people on his way in to the place where he will stay during his visit to Berlin.

    The center’s spacious shrine hall was brilliant with huge gold brocaded images of the Buddha’s life and also of Guru Rinpoche, the central figure for the Nyingma and also key to the Kagyu. Actually, the Karmapa is known as an emanation of Guru Rinpoche, a truth which was abundantly clear during the Kagyu Monlam this year in Bodhgaya which focused on Guru Rinpoche. The Karmapa embodied him during the lama dancing, a Guru Rinpoche practice was performed for four days, and the Karmapa gave two Guru Rinpoche empowerments. Today, after entering the shrine room, the Karmapa must have felt very much at home during the prayers to Guru Rinpoche and the recitation of his mantra, led by a woman with a beautiful voice.

    The head of all the Rigpa centers, Sogyal Rinpoche, gave a very warm welcome to the Karmapa, saying that His Holiness is “….considered to be one of the most important lamas alive today after His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The Gyalwang Karmapa has been acknowledged as one of the most brilliant representatives of a new generation of spiritual leaders. He has a modern pragmatic attitude while embodying completely the Buddhist spiritual tradition, its culture and values….

    “As a scholar, a meditation master, a painter, poet, song writer, playwright—a great artist—the Gyalwang Karmapa continues the enlightened activities of the Karmapas over the centuries. In addition, he’s an environmental activist and a computer enthusiast, whose teachings are often webcast live. The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa is someone who is actually aware of the problems of today and has brought the wisdom and the compassion of his unique lineage fully into the 21st century….

    “He is the teacher for now. I see in him all the qualities we need: he’s an artist and environmentalist, and very practical. No wonder the Gyalwang Karmapa would manifest in an incarnation that is suited for this time. I really am extremely inspired by his activity. If there’s any way that myself or the Rigpa sangha as a whole can serve in your vision or in your activities, we will be there at your service.” [Tashi, would you please put a link here to the full text of Sogyal Rinpoche's talk? Thanks.]  Sogyal Rinpoche’s heartfelt speech was followed by a brief offering of a mandala and the representations of body, speech, and mind.

    The Karmapa then spoke to the hundreds of students who had been especially invited to this meeting. “This is the first time I’m coming to Europe, and it took a long time. At the age of seven, I was recognized as the Karmapa, and since then, I’ve been meeting people from Europe, who have asked me to come here. Now I’m twenty-nine, so it took many years.” The Karmapa expressed his gratitude to Sogyal Rinpoche for hosting him in Berlin and giving him such a warm welcome.

    His Holiness also spoke of the great benefit Sogyal Rinpoche’s work had brought, singling out his book, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, as having especially helped others. The Karmapa said in English: “In front of all the students of Rigpa with this wonderful teacher, I don’t have to say anything. This is my small excuse. A good one. Sogyal Rinpoche told me that all the Rigpa students are practicing Dzogchen, the realization of mind. I should say something about Dzogchen. It’s beyond myself, beyond imagination.”

    He continued, “I feel that in order to practice Dharma, the basis of our practice should be strong. Any instruction text you look at, you will first find teachings on the precious human life.  So we need to see the value of this life and to take responsibility for it. For example, I received the name of the Karmapa, and I think it’s a great opportunity to do something, to serve people. I take this opportunity as a responsibility. Karmapa means ‘the one who accomplishes the activity of the Buddha.’  The Karmapa is an ‘action man’.” He added, “Actually, everyone has the capacity to perform the activity of the Buddha. Everyone can become the Karmapa.” But he counseled, “We should not take this responsibility to help others as a burden or a pressure on us. If we can generate compassion and kindness for living beings, this responsibility will not be a burden; it will turn into courage and strength.”

    He concIuded by saying, “I don’t want to talk too much about Dharma now, but take this opportunity to appreciate what Sogyal Rinpoche is doing and to encourage you to follow his teachings and try to do something in this life that is useful to yourself and others. I’m grateful for Rinpoche’s activity. I rejoice in it and that of all his students.”

    The Karmapa ended on a light note. His throne faced the back wall of the shrine hall where large photographs of great lamas, such as the previous incarnations of Dudjom Rinpoche, Dilgo Khyentse, and the Karmapa, were hung along the very top. “I’m also feeling some pressure,” he divulged. “I’m surrounded by buddhas and bodhisattvas. They are looking at me, and so I’m feeling a little bit nervous.”

    Thus the warm and open welcome of the Karmapa to Berlin came to a close with prayers to Tara, the female embodiment of enlightenment, aspirations for the Dharma and the activity of the Karmapa to spread, and a dedication for the benefit of all living beings.

    more pics on flickr


    http://karmapafoundation.eu/gyalwang-karmapa-arrives-berlin/

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    El líder religioso tibetano Ogyen Trinley Dorje lamentó hoy en Berlín que las presiones económicas y financieras puedan afectar las decisiones de los gobiernos a la hora de regular asuntos como la justicia universal. 
    AGENCIA EFE | JUNIO 6 DE 2014



    Berlín, 6 jun (EFE).- El líder religioso tibetano Ogyen Trinley Dorje lamentó hoy en Berlín que las presiones económicas y financieras puedan afectar las decisiones de los gobiernos a la hora de regular asuntos como la justicia universal.
    "Actualmente estamos afrontando una situación de gran poder económico y financiero, lo cual complica mucho las cosas y tengo que decir que me entristece, pero es la situación que hay ahora mismo", dijo a Efe Trinley Dorje sobre la reforma española de la ley de la justicia universal.
    El pleno de la Audiencia Nacional discute hoy si accede al cierre de la causa por la represión en el Tíbet, que afecta a cinco exdirigentes chinos, entre ellos el expresidente Jian Zeming, después de la reforma de la ley de justicia universal efectuada por el Gobierno.
    Trinley Dorje, de 28 años, es el XVII Karmapa o líder de una de las cuatro corrientes que componen el budismo tibetano y vive desde el 2000 en el exilio junto al Dalai Lama en Dharamsala (norte de la India).
    A pesar de la distancia, Trinley Dorje asegura que mantiene contacto directo con medio centenar de monasterios situados en el Himalaya y emplea esa influencia para animar a los monjes a que cuiden el ecosistema e influyan en las comunidades circundantes.
    Trinley Dorje se encuentra en la capital alemana en lo que supone su primer viaje a Europa, donde ha aprovechado para visitar la emblemática Puerta de Brandeburgo y el monumento al Holocausto.
    El Karmapa rechazó querer ser sucesor del Dalai Lama, el líder político y espiritual de los tibetanos en el exilio.
    "Poseo el nombre de Karmapa y por ello tengo el liderazgo de una de las escuelas (del budismo), pero no necesito más responsabilidades y no puedo llevar más peso", comentó.
    "Por supuesto que trato de hacerlo lo mejor posible, pero no se trata de tener éxito o de ser el próximo Dalai Lama", incidió.
    Hasta el próximo lunes, Trinley Dorje aprovechará para recibir a grupos de fieles budistas europeos e impartir conferencias en torno al medio ambiente y al poder de la mente como agente del cambio.

    "Mi mensaje no es realmente un mensaje religioso, creo que tenemos un asunto muy urgente para el mundo como es el cambio climático y creo que necesitamos cambiar algo en nuestro corazón y nuestra mente, nuestras motivaciones, nuestra mirada al mundo", manifestó. EFE


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    4 June, 2014 – Berlin
    Tibetan Buddhist leader, His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, arrives today in Berlin on his first European visit. The Karmapa will meet this week with members of the Jewish community in Berlin, and visit the Holocaust Museum and the Berlin Wall. On a stop in Cologne, he was specially invited by the Archdiocese of Cologne to address faculty and students at the Katholische Fachhochshule NRW and was offered a private tour of the Cologne Cathedral.
    Although this is only the Karmapa’s third trip outside his dramatic escape from Tibet to India, he enjoys a wide following in the West, where his message of social responsibility and environmental sustainability has been warmly embraced. At the age of 29, he is the head of the 900-year-old Karma Kagyu lineage, one of the largest schools of Tibetan Buddhism.
    The five-day visit to Berlin marks the second stage of this Tibetan Buddhist leader’s European visit, centred on Germany. From 5-8 June, the Karmapa will be teaching daily to a sold-out hall at the Estrel Convention Centre in Sonnenallee in Berlin. He will deliver public addresses on social responsibility for youth, Buddhism and the environment, and will also give a religious transmission from the 13th century to his followers. In keeping with the inter-religious themes of his visit, he will meet Rabbi Ben-Chorin and Rabbi Gesa Ederberg, leaders of the Jewish Community of Berlin.
    During the first leg of the trip, the Karmapa addressed large gatherings of the Buddhist faithful at his European seat in Eifel, and joined Benedictine monks for vespers service at Maria Laach Monastery. Abbot Benedikt hailed his visit as an auspicious meeting of two religious cultures, remarking that the Karmapa lineage and the Maria Laach Monastery were both founded 900 years ago.
    “There is no copyright on compassion,” the 17th Karmapa told the assembly at the Catholic university in Cologne on 2 June. “It is certainly not owned by Tibetan Buddhism, but is shared commonly by all religions.” He also visited the Cologne Cathedral, where he was greeted by Auxiliary Bishop Dominikus Schwaderlapp and Bishop Ansgar Puff, with Vicar General Msgr. Stefan Hesse acting as managing head of the archdiocese since the recent retirement of the esteemed Archbishop of Cologne, Joachim Meissner.
    The Karmapa currently lives in North India near His Holiness the Dalai Lama, with whom he maintains a close relationship of mentor and protégé. While fully upholding the traditions of his lineage, the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, has actively modernized its religious practices in keeping with 21st-century needs. He has founded an environmental association of Himalayan monasteries and nunneries in grassroots sustainability work.


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    Estrel Convention Centre, Berlin
    7.30pm, 5th June, 2014
    A crowded hall greeted the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, when he arrived shortly after 7.30pm this evening to deliver his first public address here in Berlin at the Estrel Convention Center. A few minutes earlier, Ringu Tulku, the 17th Karmapa’s Representative in Europe, had taken the stage in order to quieten the excited hubbub in the hall.  For the majority of European disciples awaiting his arrival, this was their first opportunity to see him in the flesh. Only twenty-eight years old, Ogyen Trinley Dorje heads the 900 year old Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism, and is already viewed as an authoritative spiritual leader for the 21st century.
    The Karmapa’s first ever trip to Europe coincides with Sagadawa, the holiest month in the Tibetan calendar, when Buddhists commemorate and honour the life of Shakyamuni Buddha.  As Buddha’s birthday fell on 5th June this year in some traditions, Ringu Tulku reminded everyone that the first day of the teaching in Berlin was particularly auspicious. Tibetans believe that the merit of any good deeds that you perform during this month is multiplied by one hundred thousand, so it is an appropriate time to engage in all forms of spiritual activity, including studying Dharma and listening to teachings.
    His Holiness sat down in the large armchair, kicked off his shoes and tucked his legs beneath him in a traditional cross-legged posture. Above him, hung a photograph of the Shakyamuni Buddha image in the Mahabodhi Temple, Bodhgaya; the earth touching mudra signifying the moment of the Buddha’s enlightenment. The thangka to Karmapa’s right portrayed Guru Rinpoche; the 17th Karmapa is regarded as a manifestation of Guru Rinpoche. To his left, was a thangka  of Shakyamuni Buddha.
    A small wooden table beside his chair held a pot of pure white orchids, a glass and a bottle of mineral water.
    Composing himself, the Karmapa sat in thought for a few moments. Then he began by welcoming everybody and saying how delighted he was to be here in Berlin.  He had  wanted to visit Europe for so many years,  and finally his wish had been realised.
    In the Tibetan tradition, lamas usually wear a yellow shawl called a chögu during ceremonies and when they teach. Although he had one folded over his left shoulder, he wasn’t wearing it, which would have puzzled the Dharma practitioners in the audience. So he explained his dilemma in Berlin.
    Referring back to the teachings in Nuerburgring, he said that there he had given formal Dharma talks and so had worn achögu. In Berlin, however, the situation was different and less formal, so he had compromised and dressed half formally and half informally.
    The topic for his first public talk was to be “Ancient Wisdom for the Modern World: Heart Advice for a Meaningful Life”. “That’s too long for me,” he joked, and everyone smiled.
    “How to live a meaningful life?” He screwed up his face and pursed his lips in mock puzzlement— the audience laughed.
    Now, with everyone listening attentively, he began to share his thoughts and experiences in a very frank sometimes sobering account of his own life so far. There was humour and irony at times, but always an underlying seriousness. By examining his own life, His Holiness skilfully clarified what makes a life meaningful, and gave a thought-provoking insight into the reality of being the Karmapa.
    The happiest days of his life were when he was a little nomad boy, free to run across the meadows of Tibet, with the snow mountains in view.  Then, everything had changed when, at the age of seven, he was recognised as the 17th Karmapa, removed from his family, and taken to Tsurphu Monastery, near Lhasa in Tibet. That was where he first encountered Europeans, he remembered, just a short way from  Tsurphu, at a place called Karmapa’s Summer Park. There he saw two rather tall and skinny Westerners. To the young nomad they seemed like people from another planet – aliens! Since that time, of course, he had met far more Europeans and now counted many as his friends, and finally, twenty one years later at the age of twenty-eight, he had been able to travel to Europe.
    The greatest change in his life came about because of his decision to leave Tibet and go to India. His motivation in so doing was to be able to travel widely, which China would not allow. When he went to India, his main purpose was to be able to visit other parts of the world, meet his Dharma students and carry out the responsibilities and Dharma activities of the Karmapa. So, not knowing whether he would be successful or not, he embarked on a journey to India, a trek undertaken by many other young Tibetans. Though they were facing an uncertain future, he reassured his travelling companions that whatever transpired, because of their sincere and pure motivation, they had set their faces in the right direction towards India and should have no regrets.
    During the fourteen years he spent in Tibet, and the fourteen years he has spent so far in India, he was not always able to do what he wanted, and has faced many obstacles and difficulties. “Everything that has happened to me in this life was not by my choice, it fell upon me,” he said. “If I’m to speak to you about a meaningful life, perhaps I should ask myself first whether my life is meaningful, and whether I am happy about my life or not.”
    The first point to understand is that a meaningful life requires effort. There was no sudden transformation, he explained, when he received the title Karmapa, and he has no special power.  Instead, he has always had to work hard on his motivation, study hard, and put in a sustained effort to make his life meaningful.
    The second point to understand is that living a meaningful life may carry a cost on the personal level. If someone has a job and a family, it might be different, but for His Holiness, his personal life and being the Karmapa cannot be separated: “It’s not like a normal life.  Personal life, personal rights, personal freedom, I don’t have these. So for me Karmapa is everything. What’s your name? Karmapa. What’s your job? Karmapa. Who are you? Karmapa…” The audience laughed. His Holiness had spoken with humour. But, in order to fulfil the role of Karmapa, he has had to give up a personal life and his personal freedom.
    A meaningful life requires being able to fulfil the role you have in life, he explained. The title ‘Karmapa’, from the Sanskrit word for action, means the man or woman who takes action, the one who carries out the activities of the Buddha. “Its action man,” he quipped. “My activity is to accomplish benefit for the lives of other beings. If the Karmapa’s life is of benefit to others it is meaningful. If I can’t do that, my Karmapa life is a failure.”
    We do not exist in isolation, and in order for our lives to have meaning, we depend on the existence of others whom we can benefit.  “Karmapa’s activity, and my aim, is to benefit sentient beings. My meaningful life is totally dependent on other sentient beings,” he elaborated. His Holiness spoke of his prime responsibility to reduce the suffering of others as much as possible. He spoke movingly of leaving his homeland, leaving his parents, and waiting fourteen years in India for this chance to travel to Europe.  “When I see the happiness and joy in the eyes of the people, I feel my life is meaningful. I feel that all I have done has had some meaning. I always think, from the bottom of my heart, my strength is coming from others, people like you,” he said, indicating the audience.
    “Because you have so much hope and aspiration in me, I can become stronger even though facing lots of challenges. I can be more patient because of your aspirations.”
    Finally, His Holiness tackled the question of whether he was happy or not.
    “I’m not so happy,” he admitted, “But a meaningful life is more than happiness. Happiness is temporary.”  True meaning in our lives has to go much deeper than the feeling of happiness; the meaning and purpose has to pervade our lives. It has to be there even when we are sleeping.
    “A meaningful life has to be purposeful,” he continued, “Not just for me but for other beings. We are interdependent so we live interdependently. So if I am to live a purposeful and meaningful life, I have to live it for the benefit for others.
    “I can find meaning and dignity in working for the benefit of others. That is the essence and purpose of my life.”
    As the meaning of his words sank in, many in the audience were stunned. This was truly the Way of the Bodhisattva.

    http://karmapafoundation.eu/17th-karmapas-heart-advice-meaningful-life/

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  • 06/08/14--09:53: 7 lines prayer by HH Karmapa


  • During Developing Inner Peace - The Art of Meditation. Berlin, Germany, 7th of June 2014

     

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    Orgyen Trinley Dorje, known as the 17th Karmapa, talks about greater autonomy from China


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p020h4d3

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    June, 2nd, 2014 around 4pm – our wildest dreams suddenly became reality!
    After the meeting with the Weihbischof Dominikus Schwaderlapp at the famoust Cologne Dom church His Holiness Karmapa unexpectedly visited Kyabje Tenga Rinpoche’s Dharma House Benchen Tashi Ling in Cologne. We were overwelmed by His Holiness’ kindness and tremendously fortunate to be able to offer a traditional Ku Sung Thug (Body-Speech-Mind offering). We are also very happy that not only our Dharma House members were present at the welcoming ceremony but also the representative of Benchen monastery Tempa Yarphel, the Benchen lamas: Lama Yonten Palsang and Lama Ngawang Tsultrim, representative of Benchen Karma Kamtzang Poland Lama Rinchen, representative of Lotus Direktihlfe Hanne Pohlmann and representative of Benchen Phuntsok Ling Carina Krämer-Bleicher.
    The heart connection between our Guru, Kyabje Tenga Rinpoche and His Holiness made possible for us to be a part of this precious event and we stay deeply touched by the generosity and blessing of His Holiness. Also, our gratitude goes to Tenga Rinpoche’s main Chagdzö Tempa Yarphel for his continuous efforts to make the unimaginable possible.
    May Kyabje Tenga Rinpoche’s swift reincarnation appear soon so that His Dharma acitivities shine far and wide under His Holiness’ vast Buddha-umbrella. May His Holiness live long and return to Cologne soon! Karmapa Khyenno!
    Dharma House Team,
    Martin, Lioba, Thea, Tim Tashi Boldt

    Photo by Katja Kühl

    PS. See the following link about His Holiness’ visit to the Dom:http://weltkloster.de/neues/2014/besuch-des-xvii-gyalwa-karmapa-im-kolner-dom/



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    Photo credit: James Gritz 


    Dharamsala:  The 17th Karmapa, the third most important Tibetan religious head, on Tuesday reached Delhi after a fortnight-long religious tour of Germany, one his aides said.

    This was 28-year-old Ogyen Trinley Dorje's first visit to Europe where he met Jewish and Catholic leaders, besides interacting with his followers.

    Throughout his teachings in Germany, the Karmapa reiterated his concern for the environment and his appeal for a world with less greed and more compassion, Karmapa's spokesperson Kunzang Chungyalpa told IANS.

    Stressing on personal responsibility towards the environment, he said: "We should never exploit the world we live in for the purpose of short-term benefits."

    The Karmapa, who now resides in a monastery on the outskirts of Dharamsala where the Tibetan government-in-exile is headquartered, left for Germany May 25. He has travelled to the US in 2008, his only visit abroad since he fled Tibet.

    Making headlines after a dramatic flight from Tibet to India in January 2000 when he was just 14-year-old, the Karmapa has emerged as a strong leader and retains a close relationship of mentor and protege with the Dalai Lama.

    The Karmapa is the head of the 900-year-old Karma Kagyu lineage, which he worked to modernise while remaining faithful to the authentic teachings of the Buddha.

    The Tibetan government-in-exile is based in Dharamsala but not recognised by any country in the world.




    Story First Published: 

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    Estrel Convention Centre
    6th June, 2014
    For the second day’s teaching in Berlin, the venue had changed into a bigger auditorium which seats 1600 people.
    His Holiness took time at the beginning to reiterate his great delight in finally achieving his wish to visit Europe, after three failed attempts.  However, now that he was here in Berlin, it was “like a dream that fills me with great joy” and he thanked everyone from the bottom of his heart. In fact, he added, the stage set was so beautifully decorated by the Berlin Rigpa Center, that he would have preferred to sit facing it with the audience, “So that I could see it all.”
    The stage set was indeed even more impressive than that in the smaller auditorium. Oblong tubs  of marigolds edged the front of the stage, two large vases of flowers graced the back, and the pot of white orchids still stood on the table beside His Holiness’ chair. Two trees in tubs had been added to the front corners of the stage, lit to reflect the colours of the seasons: the bright, luscious green of spring and early summer, the red of late summer and autumn, and the soft yellows of leaf fall.  The larger stage afforded space on the deep blue backdrop for additional thangkas , and one of Jetsun Milarepa, the great Tibetan mystic and forefather of the Karma Kagyu tradition, now hung alongside that of Guru Rinpoche.
    Once more, in his teaching, the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje emphasised that all of us possess positive innate qualities.  We all have great potential. We all have a ‘Little Buddha’ inside. But it’s up to us to nurture and develop it.
    He began by exploring the role of love and affection in our lives. Human beings, from the time they are born, rely on the loving kindness and care of others. We are not independent. Our very survival depends on others.  In the first instance, our parents cared for us, and not only do we owe them gratitude for the gift of this precious human body, but their care ensured that we survived.
    More important even than the gift of our physical body, our parents gave us the gift of love and affection. Those children who are deprived of love and affection are often seriously damaged and have a very difficult life. They are stressed, and feel lonely, unhappy and unloved.
    The Karmapa spoke touchingly of his own parents. “In my own life, due to fortunate circumstances, I was born to very good parents,” he said.  Neither of his parents has had a formal education. His mother is illiterate, though his father can read. Yet, he considers them as his first teachers. “They showed great loving kindness towards me, but moreover they taught me how to be kind and loving to others,” he explained. He described them as his “spiritual friends”, who taught him to treat all living beings, even the smallest insect, with kindness and compassion. They lack education in Buddhist philosophy, yet they are very devoted Buddhists; theirs is a Buddhism which comes not from logic and reasoning but from the depths of their hearts. As His Holiness acknowledged, “My spiritual journey started with the help of my parents. They taught me by example, through the way they lived.”
    The title of the teaching was “mind training”, but the Karmapa warned that mind training should not be understood as an intellectual exercise. Rather it involves ‘emotional intelligence’ as well. There is always a danger of over-intellectualisation which is incapable of transforming anything. He quoted a saying:
    “Although your wisdom didn’t grow, lots of thoughts developed.”
    As human beings, we are all born with positive innate qualities, such as loving kindness. Some people have more, some have less, and our capacity may change because of our environment and circumstances. His Holiness gave an example from his early childhood.  When autumn came, the nomads would kill some of their yaks and sheep. Life in Tibet was very hard, and his family depended on their animals for cheese, butter, yoghurt and meat, because, as he explained, there were no vegetables, or staples such as rice and potatoes.  The nomadic practice was to suffocate the animals to death, but often it would take an hour for an animal to die.  He  was about three or four years old at that time, and, seeing the great fear and pain of the animals, he would become very distraught, and run around crying for the people to stop the slaughter. But, he admitted, when the meat was cooked and served, he enjoyed eating it as much as anyone. “I gave up eating meat six years ago,” he said, “But if you ask me ‘What is your all-time favourite food?’ I would still say ‘meat’. Ask me what my favourite food is these days, and there’s nothing.”
    Loving other people, animals, and pets such as cats and dogs, comes to us naturally. Our task, therefore, is to start with that feeling of affection, then expand and extend it to include all other beings, so that it arises naturally. “This is the most important thing; to extend this natural feeling of love and affection to more and more beings.”
    When love and compassion are absent, the consequences for a society can be devastating. “Germany is a great nation,” he said, but in the 20th century, there were the First World War, the Second World War and the Holocaust.  At that time, people still had an innate capacity for love and compassion,  but they didn’t show it. Why? Because, it seems, we always have a choice; we human beings can learn to switch our compassion on and off. We can become desensitised to the pain of other living beings. We can distance ourselves or we can become apathetic and say, “It’s nothing to do with me.”
    When we consider the mass killers in this world, we might think of illnesses such as malaria or water-borne diseases, we might think of air pollution, but, if we really think about it,  lack of compassion and apathy are two of the main killers. “We cannot do without love and compassion in our human society,” he reflected.
    Our lack of love and compassion arises out of our egocentricity.  No one sets out with the intention of becoming a killer, but the potential danger is there.  Sometimes, driven by our own needs and selfishness, without wanting to and without recognising it, we can become a very dangerous person.
    The Karmapa gave an analogy:
    An elderly mother and father had just one child.  The boy got into trouble with the police and was put in prison. Without their son, the elderly parents became very unhappy, and consequently fell ill, so they were put in hospital.  They desperately needed their son’s help but he was in prison and even though he might want to was unable to help them.
    Our self-centredness is like that prison, the Karmapa explained. We have created that prison ourselves, and all our mother sentient beings are on the other side of the prison walls. Stuck inside this prison we are unable to help anyone. We have to break down the walls. How can we do this?  By developing our innate qualities, our natural kindness and compassion.
    We live in an interdependent world, so we cannot ignore the suffering of other beings without consequences for ourselves. The only way forward is to work for the mutual benefit of all.

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    Tuesday, 10 June 2014 18:03 Rajdip Ray, The Tibet Post International



    17th Gyalwa Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorjee meeting the young people at the Estrel Convention Center, Berlin, Germany, 8 June,2014. Photo: TPI 

    Dharamshala: - The 17th Gyalwa Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorjee, was greeted by a crowded hall when he came to deliver his first public talk in Berlin at the Estrel Convention Centre.
    For the majority of the European disciples, this was the first time they were seeing him in person. The 28 year old Karmapa heads the 900 year oldKarma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism, and is viewed an as authoritative spiritual leader of the 21st century.
    The Karmapa's trip coincided with Sagadawa, the holiest month in the Tibetan calendar, when Buddhists commemorate and honour the life of Shakyamuni Buddha. Tibetans believe that the merit of any good deeds that you perform during this month is multiplied by one hundred thousand, so it is an appropriate time to engage in all forms of spiritual activity, including studying Dharma and listening to teachings.
    The topic for his first public talk was to be "Ancient Wisdom for the Modern World: Heart Advice for a Meaningful Life". "That's too long for me," he joked, and everyone smiled.
    "How to live a meaningful life?" He screwed up his face and pursed his lips in mock puzzlement— the audience laughed.
    Once he had everyone's attention, he went on to share his own thoughts and experiences, amidst doses of humour and irony. By examining his own life, His Holiness skilfully clarified what makes a life meaningful, and gave a thought-provoking insight into the reality of being the Karmapa.
    The happiest days of his life were when he was a little nomad boy, free to run across the meadows of Tibet, with the snow mountains in view. Then, everything had changed when, at the age of seven, he was recognised as the 17th Karmapa, removed from his family, and taken to Tsurphu Monastery, near Lhasa in Tibet. The greatest change in his life came about because of his decision to leave Tibet and go to India. His motivation in so doing was to be able to travel widely, which China would not allow.
    "Everything that has happened to me in this life was not by my choice, it fell upon me," he said. "If I'm to speak to you about a meaningful life, perhaps I should ask myself first whether my life is meaningful, and whether I am happy about my life or not."
    The first point to understand is that a meaningful life requires effort. There was no sudden transformation, he explained, when he received the title Karmapa, and he has no special power. Instead, he has always had to work hard on his motivation, study hard, and put in a sustained effort to make his life meaningful. The second point to understand is that living a meaningful life may carry a cost on the personal level. If someone has a job and a family, it might be different, but for His Holiness, his personal life and being the Karmapa cannot be separated.
    A meaningful life requires being able to fulfil the role you have in life, he explained. The title 'Karmapa', derived from the Sanskrit word for action, means the one who carries out the activities of the Buddha. "Its action man," he quipped. "My activity is to accomplish benefit for the lives of other beings. If the Karmapa's life is of benefit to others it is meaningful. If I can't do that, my Karmapa life is a failure."
    We do not exist in isolation, and in order for our lives to have meaning, we depend on the existence of others whom we can benefit. "Karmapa's activity, and my aim, is to benefit sentient beings. My meaningful life is totally dependent on other sentient beings," he elaborated. "Because you have so much hope and aspiration in me, I can become stronger even though facing lots of challenges. I can be more patient because of your aspirations."
    In conclusion, His Holiness tackled the question of happiness and whether he was happy.
    "I'm not so happy," he admitted, "But a meaningful life is more than happiness. Happiness is temporary. A meaningful life has to be purposeful. Not just for me but for other beings. We are interdependent so we live interdependently. So if I am to live a purposeful and meaningful life, I have to live it for the benefit for others. I can find meaning and dignity in working for the benefit of others. That is the essence and purpose of my life."
    As his speech sunk in, it left many in the audience stunned and mesmerized. This indeed was the way of the Bodhisattva.
    Karmapa Rinpoche reached Delhi on 10 June after a fortnight-long religious tour of Germany, one his aides told NDTV.


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    HH the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje visiting the Theksum Tashi Choeling Hamburg (TTC) on June 2 2014.

    We have been extremely honoured and fortunate to have Him with us in His and our Center in the heart of Hamburg. The TTC-Sangha

    The Theksum Tashi Chöling Hamburg, TTC is one of HH Karmapa's oldest centres in Europe. Its origins trace back to the late 70's when the HH 16th Karmapa visited the European continent.

    Since then most of the great Karma Kagyu Rinpoches and authentic Lamas have visited and continue visiting our centre to provide teachings on Buddhist philosophy and Dharma practice. TTC regularly offers study and meditation courses for a growing Sangha.

    Acharya Lama Drime Dawa is the organizer of TTC and also the resident Lama. He performs various pujas on a weekly and monthly basis and teaches meditation. Lama Dawa conducts weekend courses for our Sangha and other Sanghas outside Hamburg and also gives interviews for individual spiritual practice. He is always available to give advise on personal problems.


     



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-kRgsmDaiY

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  • 06/10/14--20:33: Meaningful Life




  • His Holiness The Karmapa: 

    "When I see the happiness and joy in the eyes of the people, I feel my life is meaningful. I feel that all I have done has had some meaning. I always think, from the bottom of my heart, my strength is coming from others, people like you. Because you have so much hope and aspiration in me, I can become stronger even though facing lots of challenges. I can be more patient because of your aspirations. I’m not so happy, but a meaningful life is more than happiness. Happiness is temporary. True meaning in our lives has to go much deeper than the feeling of happiness; the meaning and purpose has to pervade our lives. It has to be there even when we are sleeping. A meaningful life has to be purposeful. Not just for me but for other beings. We are interdependent so we live interdependently. So if I am to live a purposeful and meaningful life, I have to live it for the benefit for others.I can find meaning and dignity in working for the benefit of others. That is the essence and purpose of my life.” 

    ... from his very touching teaching  heart advice for a meaningful life  in Berlin, Germany June 5th 201, photo Estrel Convention Centre, Berlin


    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=694687950578512&set=a.236525893061389.56288.100001119406707&type=1&theater

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    Phayul[Wednesday, June 11, 2014 12:47]




    DHARAMSHALA, JUNE 11: The 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje arrived in the Indian Capital on Monday after a two week tour to Europe, where he gave Buddhist discourses across Germany and met with Jewish and Catholic leaders. Disciples of his predecessor, the 16th Karmapa Rangjung Rigpai Dorje, travelled to Germany from 22 different European countries for an opportunity to meet the young Buddhist leader. 

    During the first leg of the tour, the Karmapa gave teaching focused on formal Buddhist philosophy and Abhisheka empowerment at his European seat of Kamalashila in the Eifel region of Germany. 

    The second leg was spent in Berlin addressing wider audiences and included cultural events, interaction with youth as well as public talks. During his teachings the Karmapa made a skillful presentation of ancient philosophy of Tibetan Buddhism. 

    “Stating that the mission of the 17th Karmapa in the 21st century is mainly Dharma activity, the Karmapa emphasized that the Dharma must change and adapt in order to suite the needs of the time while adhering to the essence of the Buddha dharma,” said Kunsang Chungyalpa who accompanied the Karmapa during the tour. 

    In Berlin, the Karmapa met with Rabbi Ben-Chorin and other members of the Jewish Community of Berlin, and joined prayers at the city’s haunting Holocaust Monument. 

    The 29 year old Karmapa, who escaped to India under mysterious circumstances in 2000, had a lively interaction in Berlin with the youth of Europe. The Karmapa exhorted the young people to assume social responsibility and make their lives meaningful. Sharing his own experience in overcoming many challenges in his life, the Karmapa said that when he received the title Karmapa, there was no sudden transformation. 

    Reflecting on his difficult escape from Tibet, the Karmapa expressed gratitude to the Government of India for its hospitality to him and fellow Tibetans. 
    Throughout his teachings in Germany, the Karmapa reiterated his concern for the environment and his appeal for a world with less greed and more compassion. 

    Stressing personal responsibility in caring for the environment, he urged - “We should never exploit the world we live in for the purpose of short-term benefits. Rather than considering the Earth as a material thing, we should consider it as a mother who nurtures us; from generation to generation we need this loving mother”. 



    http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?article=17th+Karmapa+completes+his+Europe+tour&id=34974

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    Estrel Convention Center
    June 6, 2014
    Lively conversations in the Estrel Convention Hall subsided as the Karmapa entered and walked onto the stage, his red and golden robes blending perfectly with the rich hues of the immense images of the Buddha and Guru Rinpoche arrayed behind him.
    The Karmapa began his talk on the environment, one of his major interests, by saying that it is the “biggest challenge,” the essential question for the 21st century.
    In the past, he said, he has talked a lot about the environment, about protecting forests, animals, and plants, and about how our motivation shapes the way we relate to the natural world around us. He has taken a personal interest in the environment, studying it and expressing his ideas about what needs to be done at conferences. He has also engaged in various activities, such as planting trees, protecting wild animals, encouraging people to be vegetarian, and especially,  supporting Khoryug (“Environment” in Tibetan). www.khoryug.info, an umbrella organization of fifty-five monasteries and nunneries, which belong not only to the Karma Kagyu lineage but to others as well.  It  was founded by the Karmapa and he chairs it as well. Focused on the Himalayan regions, including India, Nepal, and Bhutan, the branches of Khoryug promote protecting the environment and provide education to the nuns and monks so they can become leaders in their own communities, spreading the word about how to protect the planet and all its forms of life.
    The Himalayas and Tibet, the Karmapa explained, hold the key to the issue of water supply for the main populations of Asia, because most of Asia’s big rivers—these life-giving forces—find their source in Tibet. With many glaciers and abundant snow cover, the store of water is so great that scientists have called this whole area the Third Pole of the world. In former times, the Himalayan people naturally lived in tune with their environment. They did not have to think about it, so there was no need to protect the environment. Now that modern life has arrived with its plastics and greed, there is an urgent need to educate the people of this region about the importance of protecting their natural world. Since this is something the monks and nuns can do, they are being educated to serve the larger community.
    When we talk about Tibet, people immediately think of politics, but not all the Tibetan issues are political. The topic of the environment transcends place: it concerns not only Tibet but all of Asia, and actually, the whole world. The question of the environment in this critical region is not just about Tibet or regional politics, but it goes beyond one people and one country: it has to do with the well-being of us all. Yet we can look to Tibetan culture and spiritual traditions for a time-tested way of living in harmony with our surroundings, a way that naturally protects them.
    The Karmapa said that he had a tremendous interest in the environment but no formal education or great knowledge. However, from his childhood in the high meadows of eastern Tibet, he has kept the experience he felt of being in harmony with the natural world; his family lived in a traditional way that had not changed for thousands of years. “So I have developed a natural care and respect for the world around me. When I talk about protecting the environment, it’s not some abstract idea. I can feel it. I have a strong connection with it. “Today, many people live in the city, he said, and it’s difficult for the natural environment to appear in their minds, difficult for them to have a picture of what living in the country or in nature might be. Because of this, they cannot get a feeling for the beauty of this world and the need to protect it.
    City dwellers do not see the causes of what sustains us, only the results. When children go to the supermarket, for example, they see many different kinds of meat, all laid out and neatly packaged. They think the meat is produced at the supermarket and do not know that these pieces were once part of a living being, who went through great suffering and was killed. The cause is too far away from the result for them to know it.
    Drawing conclusions from all this, the Karmapa stated, “So I see that the issue of protecting the environment is basically an issue of our mind. How human beings act is based on their motivation, so the environmental issue is a mental issue; it is based on how we see things. “And these days, our seeing is permeated by an insatiable desire. It has gotten to the point that whatever we see, we want. We resemble a silk worm spinning its cocoon with material that comes from within itself. Our desire is just like this: It comes out from our mind, and then one desire gives rise to another and another in a continuous stream, so that our whole lives are overrun with desire. We live in a cocoon made of our constant craving.
    These days, wherever we go, we see advertisements on TV, in the newspaper, on our mobiles, or walking down the street. All the time, these ads urge us to buy this or that, creating more desire and more greed. This leads to the overuse of our limited resources and puts unsustainable pressure on the environment. This is why it is crucial to work with our minds and take real responsibility for our desire. The actual cause of environmental degradation is human greed.
    We live in a time of great materialism that leaves no time for satisfaction. Companies promise that their product will change our lives and make us happy. They almost pray that our desire will be huge while as Buddhists we are praying to reduce ours. When politicians campaign, they also make many promises. All these ads and promises are illusions. They are not based on facts. Believing them is like walking around with our eyes closed so we don’t see the real situation. Our stomach has a natural limit, but our minds’ desire is so big that it could consume universes. Clearly, it is not possible to satisfy our desires by pursuing them. Is there another way to fulfill them? This is a very important question.
    The Karmapa then said in English: “I went to an Italian restaurant and they gave me a big pizza, too big for me. Maybe we don’t need that big a pizza, one slice is enough, but for what we want, that pizza is not big enough. Even if we ate a whole planet, we still would not be satisfied. We should differentiate between what we need and what we want.” When someone runs for president, they promise everything, but if nothing is happening, we have to make changes.
    We need a balance between our outer material and our inner spiritual worlds. We can look at material things and ask ourselves: “Do I need this or not?” We don’t have to go to extremes, making huge changes and thinking that we have to give up everything like Milarepa. We need a good situation, but a simple one, not a life complicated by always wanting more. Ultimately, the reality is that what makes the mind satisfied is simple. What is ordinary can be very special. For example, breathing is quite ordinary. If our minds rest with awareness on the breath, what happens? The air naturally goes in and out; we don’t have to do anything, since the continuous, simple movement that supports our life happens without effort. This in itself can make our mind joyful and content.
    Thus the Karmapa closed his talk on living in harmony, by staying within the boundaries of our needs and within the situation of our environment. By appealing to our experience in simple language and clear logic, he brilliantly traced the line from protecting the outer environment to the need to work with our inner mind.



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  • 06/11/14--05:53: Developing Inner Peace


  • Estrel Convention Center
    7th June, 2014
    The programme this evening included a reflection on developing inner peace by His Holiness the 17th Karmapa and three performances from very different musical genres.
    The evening began with a performance of four pieces by the celebrated Chinese dissident, Liao Yiwu. He spent four years in prison, where he was tortured and physically abused. He was finally able to escape to the West in 2011 and now lives in Berlin.
    Liao used a combination of vocals, bamboo flute, wooden abacus and metal bowl-shaped temple bells to improvise.  The first and last pieces were interpretations of the 17thKarmapa’s   ‘Sweet Melody of Joyful Aspiration’, a long poem which His Holiness composed during his escape from Tibet to India.  The first piece was a wordless composition called ‘The Song of Hope’.  Liao combined the chanting and howling  of ‘Ho’ associated with Chinese religious ritual, while strumming the beads of a wooden abacus, which he held like a guitar, and was accompanied by  Marcus Hagerman on the cello. The second piece, called ‘The Seesaw of Breathing’ began with a melodious solo on the bamboo flute and cello accompaniment. This was followed by ritual ‘howling’ of the words ‘was a slogan’. The title for the piece comes from a novel by Herta Müller, the Romanian novelist who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2009. The book tells the story of the German-Romanians transported under the Russian Communists to Soviet work camps.
    The third piece was an impressionistic and fascinating cacophony. Liao moved easily from one instrument to another, in a combination of tones, disharmonies and rhythms.
    Called ‘Yellow River’, the final piece was an improvisation using flute, abacus and bowls on music written by His Holiness.
    Having thanked Liao and Marcus, His Holiness joked, “I don’t know how to play any music, and I don’t know how to sing, so I have nothing to do.  Perhaps I can hoo, hoo, ho,” he laughed,  singing a couple of bars of music in imitation of Liao Yiwu’s genre.
    The topic for His Holiness’ address was to be “Developing Inner Peace”.
    Historically, in Tibet,  the Karmapas are renowned for their artistic talent. They have composed liturgies with music, produced beautiful calligraphies, crafted Buddhist images, and even founded a school of painting known as the Karma Gadri.  The 17th Karmapa stands firmly in this artistic tradition. He began by describing his own interest in various art forms:  calligraphy, drawing and painting, composing music, playing musical instruments, and theatre. Then, speaking very  frankly ,he related how through these arts, he derived strength and peace of mind during troubled times. Sharing his personal experiences once again, he afforded his audience an insight into his own inner life and the struggles he has faced.
    His Holiness spoke of how he calmed his own mind when he faced obstacles: “If I can draw or paint, I can see the result, bring something to completion”. Thus, when difficulties arose, he had discovered a way to lift his spirits and calm his mind by completing an achievable task.
    Whatever we do, he advised, should be natural and spontaneous, uninhibited like a young child. This is especially true when we want to help others; our compassion and loving kindness should arise naturally and spontaneously, even though this might mean that sometimes we will face rejection when we were only trying to help.  On the other hand, too much thinking and conceptualisation can interfere when we try to help people; natural spontaneity is very important in expressing our innate love and compassion.
    Now it was His Holiness’ turn to perform as part of the programme of cultural events.
    He announced that he would recite the Seven Line Prayer to Guru Rinpoche, and instructed the audience to meditate during the chanting. Those who didn’t know how to meditate, should simply breathe and let their minds relax.
    There followed the most moving and extraordinary performance of them all, as His Holiness the 17th Karmapa extemporised to produce a new melody for chanting both the Seven Line Prayer and Guru Rinpoche’s mantra  ‘OM AH HUM BENZE GURU PEMA SIDDHI HUM’. His rich baritone filled the auditorium, increasing in power as the melody formed. There was total stillness in the hall as the Karmapa’s  voice rose and fell—one of the most profound moments in his European tour. Within hours, it was posted on YouTube and had gone viral on Facebook.
    Buddhism for the 21st century has been one of the themes of this tour, and the next performer meets this need in a rather different way. Dechen Shag Dagsey, a Tibetan who has lived in Switzerland since 1963, wore a fashionable Khampa-style chuba, with the sleeves tucked into a wide brocade belt, and traditional Tibetan jewellery – two necklaces, one of huge beads of amber, one of turquoise.
    “My heart is filled with joy and happiness that His Holiness the 17th Karmapa is here in Europe and that I am able to perform these mantras for him,” she said.
    The first song was her own version of OM AH HUM BENZE GURU PEMA SIDDHI HUM, sung in traditional Tibetan style. Her clear, plangent voice filled the auditorium in a haunting melody evocative of the vast plains and Snow Mountains of Tibet.
    Dechen is known for transforming traditional mantras into new settings, especially using electronic music in the backing.  She sang her next piece, the ‘Hundred Syllable Mantra to Vajrasattva’, in a mix of contemporary styles. Strongly committed to preserving Tibetan culture in the West, she has tried to make it more accessible to the younger generation by using modern, up-beat melodies, in a fusion of Eastern and Western musical traditions.
    Her third contribution was a rendition of the Refuge Prayer, which switched between Sanskrit and Tibetan, with varying melody and rhythm.
    The final performer was Jan  Blumenroth. Kneeling on the stage, his knees splayed like a rock star, and hugging the microphone tightly to his chest, he sang his own version of ‘Karmapa Khyenno’. With a strong beat and elements of rap and rock, this was a very unusual rendition, but also the one most appreciated by younger people in the audience.
    They are the future, so it was appropriate that the concert finished with a musical form they could relate to.



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    The first Visit to Europe by His Holiness the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje from the 28th May till 9th June in Germany has been a remarkable success and a landmark event.  The Karmapa Foundation Europe (KFE) has endeavoured  to provide the necessary support for the Visit.
    We wholeheartedly thank His Holiness for his generous presence in Europe and for the simplicity and clarity of his deep teachings.  His spiritual instructions touched the hearts of all those present at the different venues and Dharma Centres in Germany and of people – throughout Europe and worldwide – who were unable to attend the events,  yet could follow the teachings through the webcasts.
    The Karmapa Foundation Europe wishes His Holiness a safe return to India, particularly thanks the German organizers for having organized so successfully the event  and hopes that this Visit will be the first of many regular visits to our various countries – if possible, every year.
    Such has been his presence among us that Europe is no longer the same, for he leaves behind him seeds of spiritual renewal. Now it is up to us Europeans to enact his wisdom and love in our own lives and to keep up the operational momentum created by the Visit.
    For a start, the Karmapa Foundation Europe means to produce a book in several European languages of the teachings given in Germany, whose title might well be “The Future Starts Now”. The aim is to promote knowledge about the Karmapa and his work in Europe and beyond.
    During the Visit, His Holiness made a specific request to the Foundation – and hence indirectly to Europeans – to support his education and healthcare initiatives throughout the Himalayan area, including Tibet. These will initially target monasteries and nunneries, extending later to the population at large.  This broad programme will of course be implemented step by step.


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    11/06/2014 à 10h06


    Ogyèn Trinlé Dorjé | XVII° Karmapa


    Le XVIIe Karmapa à New Delhi en juin 2013 (Tsering Topgyal/AP/SIPA)


    Je suis né dans une famille nomade d’un coin reculé du Tibet oriental. Étant donné que nous étions des éleveurs, nos déplacements étaient réglés par les conditions climatiques, les ressources en eau et l’état du sol.

    Ma famille vivait du terroir de manière très simple et très frugale. L’idée de détenir des terres et de traiter la nature comme une propriété nous était étrangère.
    Nous vivions dépourvus des facilités du monde moderne et n’avions que très peu de possessions, mais ma famille et ma communauté étaient heureuses et satisfaites.
    À l’âge de huit ans, je fus reconnu comme le XVIIe Karmapa et l’on m’amena au monastère de Tsourpou dans le Tibet central – siège traditionnel des Karmapas – où j’étudiai la philosophie et la méditation bouddhistes.
    Ces études renforcèrent ma compréhension du lien profond qui unit les hommes et leur environnement physique. Ce n’est cependant qu’après avoir fui le Tibet qui j’ai commencé à prendre conscience de l’importance écologique des lieux où j’avais grandi et de la sagesse du mode de vie nomade qui avait permis de conserver cet écosystème fragile.
    Tibet, le « Troisième Pôle »
    Le pays de mon enfance – le Tibet – est appelé le « Troisième Pôle » du fait qu’il recèle les plus grandes réserves d’eau et de glace après l’Arctique et l’Antarctique.
    Cet écosystème, qui constitue le plus haut et le plus vaste plateau du monde, est la source des principales rivières de l’Asie, notamment le Gange, le Bhramapoutre, le Mékong et le Yangtsé, rivières qui fournissent l’eau de près d’un cinquième de la population mondiale.
    Dans mon pays d’adoption, l’Inde, elles apportent l’irrigation et l’eau potable à des centaines de millions de gens.
    Les scientifiques nous disent que la température moyenne du plateau tibétain s’élève à une vitesse deux fois plus rapide que le reste du monde : 0,2° tous les dix ans depuis plus d’un demi-siècle. Il en découle que les glaciers du Tibet fondent rapidement, ce qui risque d’entraîner des effets catastrophiques pour la plupart des pays d’Asie continentale.
    Le changement climatique est un des plus grands défis auxquels les êtres vivants sont confrontés. Si nous ne trouvons pas le moyen de vivre en harmonie avec notre environnement, nous devrons tous en subir les conséquences, où que nous vivions.
    Qui recevra les centaines de millions de réfugiés du changement de climat ?
    Lors de la Conférence sur le Changement Climatique des Nations Unies qui s’est tenue à Copenhague, le Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies pour les Réfugiés a déclaré que 36 millions de personnes avaient déjà été déplacées en raison de catastrophes naturelles soudaines.
    Les scientifiques ont annoncé que ce nombre pourrait monter jusqu’à 200 millions d’ici 2050 en raison du changement climatique. Réfugié moi-même, je ressens une grande peine à l’égard de ceux dont la vie a été dévastée par le changement climatique mais qui ne sont pas représentés à la table des nations.
    Quand j’ai quitté le Tibet, j’ai eu la chance de rencontrer un accueil chaleureux en Inde, pays qui s’est offert comme sanctuaire pour tous les réfugiés tibétains, donnant l’exemple de la générosité et de la liberté.
    Qui recevra les centaines de millions de réfugiés du changement de climat qui se présenteront lorsque les conditions de vie se durciront ?
    Lors de mon premier voyage en Europe, je voyagerai en Allemagne en juin au même moment où se tiendra à Bonn une réunion des Nations Unies sur le changement climatique.
    Près de deux cents pays y seront représentés afin de poursuivre les négociations en vue d’un nouveau traité international, dans l’optique de la Convention onusienne des Parties sur le Changement Climatique qui aura lieu au Pérou plus tard dans l’année [la suivante a lieu à Paris en décembre 2015, ndlr].
    Prêter sérieusement attention au Tibet
    Il est important de prêter sérieusement attention au Tibet dans le cadre des discussions sur le changement climatique. En accord avec le message du dalaï lama sur la protection de l’environnement et l’interdépendance, la coopération entre les représentants des nomades tibétains aussi bien que des scientifiques chinois et des émissaires des nations en val qui dépendent de l’eau du Tibet est cruciale.
    La nature même de la vie est interdépendance. Il nous est impossible de prendre la moindre bouffée d’air sans l’oxygène que fournissent les arbres lorsqu’ils respirent, ni de manger un seul repas sans l’azote du sol qui nourrit les plantes.
    Bien que je ne sois qu’un moine et très peu formé dans les sciences de l’environnement, je suis toujours frappé de voir tout ce qu’elles ont en commun avec le bouddhisme, notamment la compréhension de ce que l’animé et l’inanimé font partie d’un tout et sont mutuellement dépendants en tant que facteurs permettant l’émergence de la vie.
    Si nous pouvions vivre pleinement conscients de cette interdépendance, il ne fait aucun doute que nous prendrions soin de la terre autant qu’elle prend soin de nous.
    Nous pouvons nous sentir découragés lorsque nous voyons que les discussions internationales sur le changement climatique n’ont jusqu’à présent pas apporté de solution.
    Cependant, je mets un grand espoir dans la participation grandissante de peuples du monde entier. Que ce soit dans le Gujarat indien ou la région du Rhin en Allemagne, je vois partout des panneaux solaires, des éoliennes et d’autres marques de solutions climatiques innovantes.
    Il n’y a jamais eu un aussi fort consensus sur la planète concernant ce qui doit se faire pour empêcher la température globale de monter de deux degrés supplémentaires.
    Pour cette raison, un moine bouddhiste tel que moi suit de très près les réunions de l’ONU sur le changement climatique. Je prie pour que ces rencontres mènent à un accord global qui protégera tous ceux qui vivent sur cette planète.
    Nous ne pouvons pas renoncer. Nous ne devons pas renoncer. Nous devons trouver en nous-mêmes les ressources pour poursuivre le dialogue dans chaque aspect de notre vie, en tant que personnes dans notre voisinage et en tant qu’organisations gouvernementales ou non gouvernementales à Bonn et à Lima.
    Pour que nous devenions une planète viable, une révolution est nécessaire dans notre pensée et notre comportement. Le temps de cette révolution est maintenant venu.
    MAKING OF
    Orgyèn Trinley Dorjé est considéré par les Tibétains comme le XVIIe Karmapa, la troisième position dans le bouddhisme tibétain après le dalai lama. Agé de 28 ans, il s’est enfui du Tibet sous domination chinoise à l’age de 14 ans, à la veille de l’an 2000, pour se réfugier à Dharamsala, en Inde, où se trouvent aussi bien le dalai lama que le gouvernement tibétain en exil. Il est considéré par beaucoup comme un successeur possible du dalai lama vieillissant comme figure centrale du bouddhisme tibétain en exil, alors que le pouvoir chinois tente de semer la confusion en favorisant sa propre « réincarnation » du Karmapa... Ses prises de parole sont rares et ce texte qui mêle à la fois des considérations sur l’environnement mais aussi sur le sort du Tibet, constitue une étape dans l’émergence de ce personnage central -et jeune- du bouddhisme tibétain. P.H.



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    Thursday 12 June 2014





    Statesman News Service
    Gangtok, 11 June


    The Joint Action Committee, Karmapa to Rumtek, today expressed hope that its dream for the Karmapa to occupy the Rumtek monastery seat may come true very soon, as Sikkim chief minister Pawan Chamling has “endorsed” the issue when he took it up with Prime Minister Narendra Modi in a meeting in New Delhi.


    “Our dream of Karmapa to Rumtek is going to turn into a reality soon, especially after the endorsement by the chief minister during his first meet with Narendra Modi,” said T Lachungpa, the spokesperson of the Joint Action Committee.


    Addressing the Press here today, Mr Lachungpa said: “We express our gratitude to the chief minister for strongly endorsing the issue of Karma Ogyen Trinley Dorjee with the Prime Minister during his first meeting.”


    Mr Chamling had apprised Mr Modi of the pending demands of the people of Sikkim and the state government’s granting of permission to the 17th Gyalwa   Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, to  take his seat at Rumtek monastery.


    “This initiative of the chief minister will definitely help us in witnessing our dream of ‘Karmapa to Rumtek’ come true,” Mr Lachungpa said.


    “Karmapa to Rumtek, an organization will be leading a delegation to the Prime Minister and home minister in the near future to press the demand of granting the 17th Karmapa his seat at Rumtek Monastery,” he added.


    “We have full trust in the state government that it will take all necessary steps to bring the Karmapa back to Rumtek,” he said.


    The 17th Karmapa, the head of the Karma Kagyu sect of Tibetan Buddhism, has been a subject of controversy following the death of the 16th Karmapa, Rangjung Rigpe Dorje, in 1981.


    Following the death of the 16th Karmapa, two candidates, Ogyen Trinley Dorjee   and Trinley Thaye Dorjee have been put forward.


    The central government has banned Ogyen Trinley Dorje's travel to Rumtek. He has been living at Gyuto monastery in Dharamshala, Himachal Pradesh, since his escape to India on January 5, 2000.


    He is the head of the Karma Kagyu sect with its headquarters in Rumtek in Sikkim.





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    by admin on June 12, 2014
    - See more at: http://bodhicharya.org/blog/holiness-17th-karmapa-visits-bodhicharya-berlin/#sthash.1It9UZ8l.dpuf

    June 12, 2014




    On the sunny morning of June 5, 2014 , the Karmapa and his entourage drove down Kintzigstrasse in the former East Berlin to pay a visit to the Bodhicarya center, founded by Ringu Tulku Rinpoche.  The wood fence lining the street outside the center is decorated with colorful drawings of the eight auspicious symbols, which lead up to the main gate. Its doors are opened wide to reveal a vista of the countryside hidden in this corner of Berlin. Winding paths lined with grasses and flowers wend their way past red brick, single-story buildings to the tall meditation hall at the back of the property. On top are special rooms for the Karmapa including a balcony with a view of the gardens and the surrounding area.


    The architect Inka Drohn tells the history of this place:


    The land is protected as an historical site because it testifies to the shift from rural to urban architecture. The surrounding buildings are tall with many stories, but these are very small buildings, collected like a loose settlement with a lot of secluded corners. Given the way we run Bodhicarya, the nooks and corners are especially good for us, because they allow many different activities to happen without them disturbing each other. You can have activities for children as well as meditation happening at the same time.”


    Inka continued, “The center is structured is like a small village nestled in the big city of Berlin. We kept the scale of the houses, but we had to change the interior of the houses to fit their use. The area covers 1800 square meters, and when we’re working here and someone starts cooking, they may think there are ten people, but then they ring the gong to say lunch is ready and one hundred turn up.”


    Open to everyone from early in the morning to late at night, the center is full of activities from Tai Chi and many kinds of yoga to various levels of meditation, and even stupa building.  The members of Bodhicharya engage in hospice work and also have hosted for the last ten years, work-study seminars for students from all over the world. The center engages in interreligious dialogue and also invites teachers of different Tibetan traditions to teach. In line with the Karmapa’s deep interest in the environment, Bodhicharya is involved with protecting it and was one of five places selected for the research program, Urban Strategies for Climate Change. As a contribution to the neighborhood, the center built a playground for children. The programs at Bodhicharya are run completely on dana (offerings), so to support itself, the center rents out eight small apartments as well as renting out larger spaces for a variety of classes.


    When the Karmapa came to this center of spiritual and social activity, he first stopped at a large circle of white stones surrounded by gardens so that he could bless this site for a six-meter tall stupa and lay its first building stone. He then entered the two-story open space of the main shrine hall, where the members of the community and specially invited guests waited for him.


    Ringu Tulku Rinpoche welcomed him, saying, “It has been our wish and long waiting that His Holiness the Karmapa could visit this place. It was built for you, and we are in the process of adding some rooms for you, so that hopefully during the next visit you could stay here.


    This was a very old place, a ruin which the city gave us. For over ten years we have been rebuilding it, mainly with volunteer help. We got this statue of the Buddha from an artist in Munich where it was kept on its back on the street. Many Buddhists protested and wanted to take it away, but nobody came forward, so we did.” With his characteristic sense of humor, Rinpoche added, “We gave refuge to the Buddha.”


    He went on to describe the environment of the center. “In thus small place, we have over five hundred medicinal plants growing and registered by a botanist. A special and rare kind of bee lives here as well as two other kinds of insects about to become extinct…. Although the place is not complete we have lots of activities going on. Every week there are thirty courses that cover topics such as Buddhist meditation, yoga, dance, and archery. Bochicharya is run as a rime (nonsectarian) center so we invite masters from many traditions as well as from the many schools of Tibetan Buddhism. We train hospice workers and have served one hundred people in their homes.  So even thought the center is not finished, we have lots of activities going on.”


    Ringu Tulku Rinpoche closed with a request for the Karmapa to bless and give them guidance, to really take over this place and make it useful for many people in the future.  The monk Tenzin then read out a formal request to His Holiness, asking him “ to be the head of our center. Until we attain enlightenment, may we help you in the Buddha activity that you are predicted to perform for all the beings in the world.” Tenzin then offered the Karmapa a large, symbolic golden key to the center.


    The Karmapa responded that the Karma Kamtsang seems to have a special connection with Europe. “From my information, when Tibetan Buddhism first came to the West, especially to Europe, the masters who established it here seem to be more from the Karma Kamtsang tradition, so there’s a special karmic relationship between us.


    In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, all the different vehicles are practiced and studied, so it preserves a very complete and inclusive practice of Buddhism. Usually, we think of the Tibetan tradition as being divided between the Nyingma, Kagyu, Geluk, and Sakya. But actually, it’s not like that. When we consider the individual lineages that the lamas transmit and their main seats, these are varied; however, ultimately they are not different. They are all the Buddha’s teachings and should be practiced.


    First we should find a lama and a practice that is suitable for us, so we can establish a stable foundation. The practice of calm abiding can provide this. Afterward, without throwing away our old practice, we can practice and study in other traditions. When lamas from other traditions come to teach at Kagyu center, it provides a good opportunity for the people there. We did not have much of an opportunity to do this in Tibet.”


    Turning to English, The Karmapa cautioned, “When we first become followers of Tibetan Buddhism, some lamas will tell us, ‘You belong to this lineage.’ They want us to have a strong sense that we are a follower of such and such lineage. They teach a kind of fundamentalism. Actually, a good lama should teach you how to practice, how to be a good person, to generate compassion and love. Fundamentalism is not good, and that’s why here in this center, Rinpoche invites lots of masters from different traditions and lineages. This is a great opportunity for all of you. In Tibetan society sometimes we didn’t have this opportunity; we only connected with the lamas who belonged to our lineage. I think it is very important to invite masters from other traditions.


    Finally, I want to say thank you very much to Rinpoche and to all the Bodhicarya members and staff.  I feel very grateful that on this first trip to Europe, I could come to this center. It’s very wonderful and I’m very happy. Thank you so much.“


    See all the Karmapa Foundation Europe’s images (taken by our own Francois Henrard) here.






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