Quantcast
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog



older | 1 | .... | 15 | 16 | (Page 17) | 18 | 19 | .... | 86 | newer

    0 0


    Monlam Pavilion at Tergar Monastery, Bodhgaya
    January 4, 2014



    From the 2nd to the 4th of January, the monks and nuns have gathered in the Pavilion for three lengthy evenings of Mahakala practices, which were suggested by Situ Rinpoche, perhaps because they function to remove a wide variety of obstacles. One practice was the middle-length ceremony known as The Vermillion One, part of the four texts published in an elegant volume for the Monlam this year. The other practice was The One Hundred Thousand Feast Offerings, during which one hundred thousand each of tsok (feast offering), balingta (special food offering), and martor (red torma) are given.

    From early in the morning until late in the day, sixty-two monks and nuns have been making these offerings. They sat in a special section of the kitchen around a long L-shaped tables with large bowls of tsampa (roasted barley flour) to make the balls of the tsok which will be sprinkled with nectar and given to the poor in Bodhgaya; the thumb-print balingta, which is meant to resemble the vertebrae of a negative spirit that was subdued; and the obelisk shape of the martor which is offered in order to eliminate obstacle makers.

    These offerings have been placed at the base of the main Mahakala tormas on the shrine, which stretches across the center of the Pavilion stage.  Dominating the middle of the shrine is the large Mahakala torma, deep red with large multi-petaled flowers. To its right is the offering of the five senses and to the left, the tradition white and red tormas. Ornate, filigree bowls hold other offerings, so that the whole front of the Pavilion stage is a filled with gifts to be offered to the protectors. The aspiration that accompanies them is for the removal of all obstacles for the teachings, for those who hold and practice them and for well-being and peace in the world.



    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140104.html

    0 0


    2014/1/1

    2014/1/2

    2014/1/2

    2014/1/2

    2014/1/3

    2014/1/3

    2014/1/3

    2014/1/4

    2014/1/4

    2014/1/4

    2014/1/5

    2014/1/5

    2014/1/5

    2014/1/5

    2014/1/6

    2014/1/6

    2014/1/7

    2014/1

    2014/1

    2014/1/8

    2014/1/10

    2014/1/10

    2014/1

    2014/1

    2014/1/11




    0 0


    Taking the Vow of Refuge
    The Karmapa Continues His Commentary on The Torch of Certainty


    Tergar Monastery, Bodhgaya, India
    January 4, 2014

    The slow chant of ‘Karmapa Khyenno’ resounded throughout the Monlam Pavilion, signaling a start to the second day of the Gyalwang Karmapa’s teachings on the Torch of Certainty. Soon the sound of gyaling horns could be heard over the chanting as the Gyalwang Karmapa arrived.
    After he made three prostrations to the golden Buddha on the stage, the rest of the sangha followed suit. As ten thousand monks, nuns and laypeople prostrated in perfect synchronicity to the rhythm of a small drum, the visual effect was a reminder of the unity of the sangha, and their single shared purpose in coming together to hear the dharma.

    Ten thousand voices then united as one in supplication to the Kagyu lineage masters; in a moment of perfect unity, perfect stillness, the entire gathering offered a mandala to the Gyalwang Karmapa, chanting with a single voice.

    The Gyalwang Karmapa urged the packed hall to listen single-pointedly, with utter non-distractedness and not to miss even a single word of the teachings.

    Next he guided those gathered through the three incorrect ways of listening, likening the student to being a faulty vessel. The first fault was to be like an upside-down vessel, he said, into which the teachings cannot enter. The second fault was to be like a cracked or leaky vessel, in which, once they have entered, the teachings don’t remain. And the third fault, he explained, was to be like a filthy or poisoned vessel, in which the teachings become contaminated.

    He then went on to explain that the remedy for being an upside-down vessel is to consciously pay attention during teachings, not allowing our minds to stray. The remedy for being a leaky vessel is to carefully place and store what we hear in our minds. And finally, he said, the remedy for being a poisoned vessel is to check that we have a pure and stainless motivation.

    The Gyalwang Karmapa then picked up where he had left off the previous day with the fundamental topic of refuge. He turned to the objects of refuge, the Three Jewels, once more illustrating their qualities.

    He described the first refuge, the Buddha jewel, as the elimination of all darkness and obscuration, and the full blossoming of all light and illumination. The second refuge, which is the dharma jewel, has the connotation of improvement and correction, such as improving or correcting our minds. And the third refuge, the sangha jewel, is a harmonious society with pure discipline; it is a treasury which brings pure attributes to our minds. It is to these three that we turn when we seek refuge from the incurable illness of samsara.

    The Gyalwang Karmapa drew a clear distinction between merely going for refuge, such as praying to the three jewels for help in times of need, and taking the actual vow of refuge.
    “The refuge vow is an actual promise or commitment—a commitment or promise not to give up taking refuge in the three jewels for the duration of this life or until awakening,” he said.

    As the session wound to a close, the Gyalwang Karmapa offered the refuge vow, also known as the upasaka and upasika vow for lay people. All those taking the vow kneeled on their right knees and the Gyalwang Karmapa began chanting; once again, thousands of voices united as one to repeat the liturgy after him and receive the refuge vow.





    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140104_teaching_1.html

    0 0


    Bodhicitta: How the Light Gets In
    'The absence of compassion is the worst danger that we face.''


    Tergar Monastery, Bodhgaya, India
    January 4, 2014

    In the last session of his teaching on the Torch of Certainty, the Karmapa drew a vivid picture, in very few words, of a world without love, updating Jamgon Kongtrul's classic commentary with a description that cracked the prison walls of samsara to let the light get in.  

    Normally when we talk about danger we think of the elements; we think of unforeseeable  natural disasters or epidemics. But worse than any of these is the danger that we will become a species without compassion. Slowly without our noticing it, we could become transformed into a society completely without compassion. This world could become a place where there is no caring for one another. But this will not happen if we are willing to help one another, willing to love one another. We can prevent that danger.
    We all have within us the seed of compassion. We're not like burned seeds that cannot sprout.  We have the natural capacity for it. Why is it so hard for us to generate great compassion? It is natural from our birth to want to alleviate the suffering of others; it is not simply a Buddhist idea. Scientists tell us that compassion is hard wired.
    The bad news is that while our capacity for compassion is always there, we turn it off, like turning off the electricity, which means that practically speaking, it isn't there. As we grow up we gradually learn to repress our natural compassion. We learn not to care, until we can say when we see someone suffering, I don't care, this is not my responsibility. We learn to become jaded, hard and calloused.
    How old is our compassion?

    Following through with this analogy, the Karmapa then seemed to be posing a question to make us look inward. Why did our natural innate compassion stop? Why did we turn off the light of our love for others?

    Our natural capacity for compassion generally doesn't develop. Our compassion when very young is weak and undeveloped. We soon learn that it's unsuccessful or ineffective. We learn that it's a nuisance. Then we ignore it. We have no interest  in it. Our compassion cannot develop because it's mixed with our selfishness. What we need to do is remove the adverse conditions that obstruct our compassion and by overcoming them we are free to develop our compassion. It's not the development of something new but the development of something that is innate within us.
    When we ask the age someone has, we sometimes assess the age of their organs, some younger, some older. We need to make the same assessment of the age of our compassion. I am 28 but my age of compassion is only 5 years old. Is our compassion powerful and effective? How much can it bear? It may be that our compassion suffers from malnutrition. It needs to be nurtured.
    Rather than remaining an emotional feeling, our compassion has to be nurtured through cultivating a broader view, developing intellectual maturity.   

     It is relatively easy to feel compassion when we witness the suffering of someone we like. If we witness the suffering of someone we don't like we may feel some enjoyment at their suffering.
    We make a huge distinction between friends and enemies. It is easy to feel compassion for those who please us and difficult to feel compassion for those we dislike. An identification of those who are pleasing to us is an identification of their importance to us. We need more than an emotional understanding of this. We need an intellectual understanding. We need to go beyond our present feelings and use our faculty of reason. Why do we feel the way we do for our parents and our friends? Because of a mutual connection, love, or history, but we need to use reason to extrapolate this and extend it to all beings.
    The prevalent idea of compassion as 'mere' benevolence is not really the same as bodhicitta. We need to expand our boundaries out to the universe, and really see how pervasive  the suffering is.

    People think of compassion as mere benevolence. It is more than that, something absolutely necessary in our lives and for this world. If we think about this world alone and a single species, how many people lack food and clothing, suffer from illness, who are being killed by war or violence? These people need our loving protection. If we are willing to provide this, there will come a time when we can free beings from suffering
    Taking the Bodhisattva vow is a landmark event       
      
    Throughout our lives there are certain landmark events:. birth, the legal age of 18 which we regard as an age of maturity, graduation from school or university, then marriage etc. These are all considered landmarks in our lives.
    Taking the bodhisattva vow is the greatest of all landmarks, among all our lives. Please understand that it is a precious landmark and a passage into a new kind of maturity.
      How to receive the Bodhisattva vow:      

    The person receiving the Bodhisattva vow, because it is primarily a matter of intention, has to have the intention to receive the vow.  If the intention is not present it will not be created by the person giving the vow. To receive it you really have to have the intention to benefit all sentient beings; without that you cannot receive the bodhisattva vow.
        
        ''We are all prisoners of our self-fixation''

    Working  the images of his commentary into a powerful analogy  with enough momentum to break the prison walls of samsara and embrace the light of bodhicitta, the Karmapa quoted Tsong Khapa in concluding the teaching.

    Tsong Khapa says we are stuck in the narrow enclosure of self fixation, like a confining prison that we create for ourselves. I, me, mine. We build a prison around ourselves. We make our world very small. We create a border around ourselves, by our self fixation. Who is allowed there? Our parents, friends, not many others. We feel no connection with others; others are excluded.
    We need to cast down the walls of this prison we have built around us to get to know others. We need to become aware of it and destroy it so we can meet with others. We need to burst the chains of self fixation. destroy the prison of self fixation. If you asked someone, do you want to go to prison, they would probably say no. But if we said, you don't need to go to prison, you're already in it. We are all prisoners of our self fixation, old prisoners throughout beginning less time. We need to become free from the prison of self fixation. We need to be free if we're going to do anything to benefit others.
    To use an analogy: There is a family, two parents and one child. The parents are very old and very sick. Their only child has broken the law and gone to prison. This causes the parents worry and hardship since at their age and frail health they need their child. But their child cannot reach them because the child is in a prison within a prison.
    All beings suffering in the 3 realms of samsara are waiting for us, their only child, to come and help them. As long as we are inside and they are outside, we cannot reach them or help them. They have no support and no help. In the same way, all beings are waiting for us, their only child, to escape from our prison so we can help them and serve them.






    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140104_teaching_2.html


    0 0






    As part of the program of the 31th Kagyu Monlam, there will be the Garchen Tsechu puja. From the time of the 14th Karmapa Tekchok Dorje up to the present, there has been an unbroken tradition of performing an elaborate Garchen Tsechu puja with lama dancing according to the rituals of Guru Guhyasamaja as revealed to Guru Chowang. 

    Many different monasteries have come together to hold the Tsechu puja in the sacred site of Bodhgaya this year. The reason for this elaborate program is that Guru Rinpoche was one of the three people – the Abbot, Master, and King – who were instrumental in first spreading Buddhism to Tibet. During ancient times, our sole guide was Guru Rinpoche, and many masters have said it is extremely important to pray to him.

    Personally, from the time I was little, I have naturally felt great faith in Guru Rinpoche. So for many such reasons, I myself consider it a great fortune to be able to hold this elaborate puja among a great ocean of the Sangha in this sacred place, and I think it is also a great fortune for all the monastic and lay people who attend.

    The Tsechu practice and the rituals of the lama dance all come from a place called Tse in the region of Nedong, which is where Pakmo Drupa was born, and gradually it was passed down into the Kamtsang tradition. So we pray that by holding this puja along with the Vajra Lama dance, the teachings of Tibetan Buddhism may spread and flourish, all decline in the environment and beings may be pacified, everyone in the world may be happy, and all the people in the Noble Land of India, and in particular the state of Bihar and the sacred site of Bodhgaya, may be happy and prosperous, and I believe that this will come true.





    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    Monlam Pavilion
    January 5, 2014


    Long before the crowds arrived on day three for the empowerment of the Embodiment of the Three Jewels, or Konchok Chidu, at 6.15am the Gyalwang Karmapa was already in the Monlam Pavilion, seated on stage, quietly conducting the preparatory rituals.

    By 8am the Pavilion was once more filled to capacity, this time with the slow chant of Guru Rinpoche’s mantra—Om Ah Hung Benza Guru Pema Siddhi Hung—resounding throughout the hall, while the Gyalwang Karmapa concluded the extensive preparations.

    After taking a short break he returned to the Pavilion to start the empowerment proper, the gyaling horns that heralded his arrival harmonising effortlessly with the mantra-filled hall.
    As the Gyalwang Karmapa set the boundaries for the mandala of the empowerment, the Monlam Pavilion was transformed from the ordinary into a vast, sacred space.

    “In order to request the empowerment, please regard this place not as ordinary but as the Akanishta realm of the lotus display,” the Karmapa instructed those gathered, “and in its midst regard the empowering master as Guru Rinpoche himself.”

    The Karmapa’s voice—that of Guru Rinpoche embodied—rang bell-like throughout the sacred space, the melodies flowing out from the stage and sweeping up the minds of all those present, lifting them into a higher, more sacred state.

    As the empowerment progressed the Gyalwang Karmapa conferred the bodhisattva vow, first explaining the different ways to approach it. The first way is not to take it as a vow, but to simply generate bodhicitta, he explained. The second way is to take it as the aspiration bodhisattva vow in which we aspire to be able to bring all beings to Buddhahood. The third way is to take it as the implementation bodhisattva vow, or the vow to actually traverse that path ourselves.

    All those present in the sacred space moved in synchronicity to kneel on their right knees, with palms joined at their heart. The sound of ten thousand voices reciting the bodhisattva vow—approached at the level most suited to each individual—filled the Karmapa’s vast mandala as he led those gathered towards the door of bodhicitta, and one step closer towards Buddhahood.

    The Embodiment of the Three Jewels is a guru yoga practice, regularly practiced to this day throughout the entire Himalayas and Tibet. The practice was a ter or treasure discovered by the great terton or treasure-revealer, Jatson Nyingpo. Born in 1585, he lived during the time of the 10th Karmapa, Choying Dorje. His life was extraordinary, the Gyalwang Karmapa said, because he was a fully ordained monk or Bhikshu, which is rather unusual for tertons.

    The 10th Karmapa was one of the most important people to receive this treasure practice directly from Jatson Nyingpo. In fact, the Gyalwang Karmapa told those gathered, the terton was instructed in a vision to offer this text to the 10th Karmapa, along with four sacred treasure items—representing the four activities—that were recovered with it: a golden Vajra, a silver bell, a coral vase and a turquoise mandala.

    The empowerment wound onwards, and each of the tulkus seated on stage passed before the Gyalwang Karmapa’s throne to personally receive the vase blessing on the crown of their heads. The two heart sons, Kyabje Gyaltsab Rinpoche and Kyabje Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche waited until all the others had received it first, before finally taking their own turns.

    The sacredness of the mandala deepened as the Gyalwang Karmapa brought the initiation to its conclusion, and led the minds of all those present into contact with the blessings of Guru Rinpoche, and the empowering essence of the Three Jewels.

       

    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140105_Empowerment.html

    0 0


    Monlam Pavilion, Bodhgaya
    January 6, 2014


    HŪṂ
    In the northwest of Uddiyana
    Upon the anthers of a lotus
    You achieved the wondrous supreme siddhi
    And are renowned as the Lotus Born
    Encircled by many ḍākinis
    We practice following your example
    We ask you come and grant your blessings
    GURU PADMA SIDDHI HŪṂ

    After receiving the empowerment of Guru Rinpoche, the sangha began an extensive four-day Lama Sangdu practice inside the Monlam Pavilion, restricted to ordained monks and nuns. In order to also include all the laypeople, the Gyalwang Karmapa arranged for a special tent to be erected alongside the Pavilion, where they could sit comfortably on chairs, facing screens displaying an image of Guru Rinpoche. He then requested that they collect as many repetitions of the Seven-Line Supplication as possible.

    This short supplication is the most famous prayer to Guru Rinpoche, extremely popular throughout Tibet and the Himalayas, and an especially effective means of dispelling outer and inner obstacles.

    “The Lord Dezhin Zhekpa and others have foretold that in general, supplications to Guru Rinpoche are the essential and single means to benefit Tibet, the teachings, and living beings,” the Gyalwang Karmapa had earlier said in the lead up to the event. “These supplications are particularly important during these degenerate times.”

    Each lay person was given a card with a breathtaking colour image of Guru Rinpoche painted by the Gyalwang Karmapa on one side, and the Seven-Line Supplication inscribed in four languages (Tibetan, English, Chinese and Hindi) on the other side. “It doesn’t matter how many or how few each of you as an individual recites,” he told them, but nonetheless asked each person to keep a careful record of their count, to be accumulated together at the end.

    The Gyalwang Karmapa has a profound connection with Guru Rinpoche, and with the Seven-Line Supplication, clearly evident since his early childhood. As a young child he spontaneously knew the Seven-Line Supplication without needing to study it. When people in the local area would come to him with problems, or would ask him to give protection for traveling, he would recite the Seven-Line Supplication for them as a blessing.

    “My family, including my parents are very devoted to Guru Rinpoche and were always reciting the Seven-Line Supplication,” he told those gathered. “As we were nomads we had to move from place to place, so my father would go to the ‘lottery’ to receive his allotment of land. Before going he would say to me, ‘Now you please chant the Seven-Line Supplication as well as you can while I’m gone.’ When he came back, if he had done well in the lottery and received a good bit of land he would say, ‘Oh you chanted it well.’ And if he received a poor allotment, he would say, ‘You must not have chanted the Seven-Line Supplication very well.’”

    The Gyalwang Karmapa then briefly explained the meaning of each of the seven lines in the prayer—some literal, others symbolic.

    The first line sets the scene as Uddiyana, also called the land of the dakinis, which is one of those exceptionally sacred places in India regarded as the very origin of the secret mantra. In the land of Uddiyana there was a lake called Lake Danakosha and in the centre of that lake there appeared a lotus flower with many petals.

    “When it says ‘you have gained wondrous, supreme siddhi’, this is a brief description or summary of Guru Rinpoche’s amazing deeds and attributes of body, speech, mind, qualities and activity, as well as his achievement of supreme siddhi,” the Gyalwang Karmapa explained. “And it is followed by saying ‘you are renowned as the lotus born’. These lines are in a sense a summary of Guru Rinpoche’s deeds or life.”

    The next line says ‘encircled by many dakinis’, which means that Guru Rinpoche is surrounded by innumerable heroes and dakinis—as numerous as seeds from an open sesame pod.
    Following that, the next two lines describe how to pray to Guru Rinpoche.

    “In the next line you say ‘I practise following your example’ and this indicates an attitude of complete entrustment,” the Gyalwang Karmapa explained. “Because you trust in Guru Rinpoche’s infallibility, you entrust yourself to him. And therefore you say, since I have entrusted myself to you and I’m attempting to follow your example, please come to this place so that you can impart the blessings of your body, speech and mind to me and all beings without exception.”

    “And then it ends with the mantra, Guru Padma Siddhi HungGuru means weighty or heavy with qualities or fine attributes. Padma is the first part of Guru Rinpoche’s name; siddhi or attainment is what we seek; and hung here is an exhortation supplicating him to bestow the siddhi and blessings that we seek.” 

    The Gyalwang Karmapa then summarised the entire explanation of the Seven-Line Supplication.

    “If we summarise the supplication into the distinct meaning of each of its seven lines—first of all the person who is praying is oneself, and the object to whom one is praying is Guru Rinpoche,” he said. “The first line states the land of his origin, the second his manner of dwelling there, the third his extraordinary qualities, the fourth his actual name, and the fifth his entourage, which completes the identification of the object of supplication. The sixth line explains how we are supplicating and how we are approaching him, and the seventh is our actual request, our actual petition that he bless us and all beings, based upon our unchanging entrustment of our welfare to him.”

    Gyalwang Karmapa’s melodic voice resonated throughout the hall as he bestowed the lung or reading transmission for the Seven-Line Supplication, completing his instructions on this sacred and powerful prayer.



    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140106.html

    0 0


    Siddhartha Vihara, Bodhgaya
    January 6, 2014



    Bright sunshine greeted His Holiness on his arrival at the Siddhartha Vihara Tourist Bungalow Complex, where he was welcomed by Nangsel Dorjee, Secretary of the Mahabodhi Temple Management Committee.  Having performed the ribbon-cutting ceremony to formally open the medical camp, His Holiness was given a tour of the facility by Tenzin Jangchub, the young man who has been responsible for organizing the facility, under the guidance of Bo-Gangkar Rinpoche and Ngodup Pelzom, the Gyalwang Karmapa’s older sister.

    His Holiness toured both floors of the facility and was introduced to all the staff, greeting them warmly and thanking them for their work.  Finally, he posed with them for a group photograph.

    The Kagyu Monlam Organization is a charitable organization, so one of its most important aims is to serve the public through educational, health, and environmental projects.  As part of its commitment to put compassion into action, the 31st Kagyu Monlam will offer free medical care to all those who need it, including a medical camp based at the Siddhartha Vihara Tourist Bungalow Complex. The camp will run from 6th – 16th January, 2014.  Doctors trained in Western (allopathic) and Tibetan medicine will be available to treat patients free of charge.

    The ground floor of the octagonal building has been allocated to allopathic medical care. Two Tibetan nurse practitioners perform preliminary medical checks on weight and blood pressure before patients proceed to one of 3 consultation rooms staffed by Indian allopathic doctors. A fourth room on the ground floor houses a pharmacy where patients collect their medicine, dispensed free of charge, after the consultation.

    The upper floor has a dressing room, where patients can receive treatment for wounds and ulcers as well as injections, and two consultation rooms staffed by doctors of Tibetan medicine. In addition there is a pharmacy to dispense traditional Tibetan medicine. 

    As His Holiness has said,

    For Buddhists, especially Mahayana practitioners, one of our greatest aims is to actually benefit sentient beings. It is important for us to serve and benefit all sentient beings of all groups without bias, without discriminating against who needs help on the basis of whether they are Buddhist or not, whether they are human or not, whether they are the same nationality or not, and so forth.

    For that reason, I hope and pray that in the future the Kagyu Monlam will do more programs to help the public.



    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140106_1.html

    0 0


    January 7, 2014
    Monlam Pavilion, Bodhgaya, India



    By the 8th of December, sixty torma makers have arrived in Bodhgaya from over thirteen monasteries in India and Nepal. They will work until December 20th to make all the tormas (sculpted offerings) needed for the Monlam this year. Five of them are master artists who have been coming for years. Another twenty are making the simpler tormas and decorations of fruits and flowers, while the remaining thirty-five have come to apprentice. In the future, they will be able to assist at the Monlam and, returning to their monasteries, they will share with thousands this beautiful tradition that the Karmapa has revived and inspired into a newly refined and expressive art form.

    This year there are two teams: one for the four major tormas and one for the tormas associated with Konchok Chidu (the Embodiment of the Three Jewels), the protector practice of Mahakala, and the Tsechu puja (The Tenth Day Intensive Practice, to be covered in a later report on the Tsechu puja).

    This year, at the top of each two-meter torma is a sculpture of a master from one of the four major lineages, making graphic the importance of a nonsectarian view. In their respective order, we find Guru Pemajungne for the Nyingma, Gampopa for the Kagyu, Sakya Pandita for the Sakya, and Je Tsongkhapa for the Geluk.

    The central sculpture of each torma depicts a major event from the Buddha's life. They are known as the Four Great Celebrations that highlight the Buddhist calendar. The first is the Buddha's Enlightenment here in Bodhgaya under the Bodhi Tree where the Buddha sits calmly with great presence, his smile just emerging. The second depicts the first Turning of the Wheel of Dharma in Sarnath's Deer Park; encircled by flowers and stylized clouds, the Buddha's attention is clearly focused outward as he begins his long teaching career. The third is the Display of Miracles when, through his meditative power, the Buddha subdued opposing, demonic forces, which here surround his tranquil posture with their contorted, inhuman faces and threats of violence. Finally, the fourth torma depicts the Buddha's Descent from the Realm of Tushita where he went to repay the kindness of his mother by giving teachings to her and the gods residing there. The movement of the Buddha down through space is so animated, one can almost feel the winds of his passing by.

    Below these four central images are various kinds of offerings and Dharma articles: the offering of the seven royal articles; the thirteen necessary items for a fully ordained monk; the five sense pleasures, and the seven kinds of jewels.  Finally, below these, set in larger circles at the base of each  torma, in order, are the eight auspicious symbols combined together in the shape of a vase; Gampopa as he appeared in his famous dream, which Milarepa interpreted to reveal Gampopa's future; the four harmonious brothers (elephant, monkey, rabbit, and bird); and Long Life in Six Aspects, three of which are animate (human being, deer and bird), and three which are inanimate (rock, river, and tree). In Tibet, these are popular expressions of long life and will also be represented in one of the lama dances on the last day of the Tsechu.



    0 0






    BokarAsia Taiwan and Kagyu Ranjung Kunchab Center, Taichung, Taiwan.

    Address: "4F., No.120, Zhonggong 2nd Rd., Xitun Dist., Taichung City 407, Taiwan (R.O.C.)".

    Phone number: +886-4-2358-2662

    e-mail:krktc@ms59.hinet.net


    Each person can request up to 2 scrolls.




    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0





    January 2014 is a monkey month in the Tibetan calendar and the 10th day is the anniversary of the birth of Guru Rinpoche, the tantric master who brought Vajrayana Buddhism to Tibet in the 8th century.  It is a particularly auspicious day to connect with Guru Rinpoche, one of whose main activities is to remove obstacles in the dharma - outer, inner and secret. In many revealed texts it is said that Guru Rinpoche promised that he himself would actually appear on the tenth day of every month, and in particular, on the tenth day of the Monkey Month.

    All the Karmapas are emanations of Guru Rinpoche, but the 17th Karmapa is said to be Guru Rinpoche himself, in person.  On this day the 17th Karmapa will be the lead dancer performing in 3 of the 20 dances in an all-day Lama Dance called the Garchen Tse Chu.  The dance will be performed for the first time ever in Bodhgaya; the last occasion was at Tsurphu, in Tibet. The dancers will also include H.E. Gyaltsap Rinpoche and H.E. Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche,and monks from Benchen, Mirik and Palchen Choling monasteries, all of which hold the tradition of the Tsurphu Garchen Tse Chu.

    The Garchen Tse Chu, or 10th day Guru Rinpoche dance of the Great Encampment, was one of the major practices of the Great Encampment, which started during the time of the 7th Karmapa and lasted until the 10th Karmapa. At a time of civil unrest in Tibet, the huge encampment was caught between an army of Mongols under Gushri Khan and an army from Central Tibet. The resulting massacre saw the end of the Garchen and the 10th Karmapa barely escaping with his life.

    It was the 14th Karmapa, Tekchok Dorje, who revived the Garchen Tsechu Cham and brought it into the Tsurphu tradition, where it has been performed uninterruptedly to the present.  

    The Cham originates with a terton called Guru Chöwang, an important incarnation of one of the 25 disciples of Guru Rinpoche. Born in 1212, during the time of Karma Pakshi, the second in the Karmapa lineage, Guru Chöwang was in fact the terton for Karma Pakshi. Throughout their 900 year history, each of the Karmapas has had a particular terton who offers revealed treasure to him. In his recent teaching on the close connections of the Kagyu and Nyingma schools of Tibetan Buddhism, the 17th Karmapa described how the 16th Karmapa's mind was intermingled with the greatest Nyingma masters of his time. For this reason the Karmapas are known as terdak - the receivers of terma treasure.

    Guru Chöwang revealed the text, Lama Sangdu, from a place called Tse in the region of Nyetong, which is where Phagmo Drupa was born, and it passed into the Kamtsang tradition through Mindroling Monastery, the Phagmo Drupa, and Palpung Monastery under the 8th Tai Situ, Chokyi Jungne. The Karmapas have been the lineage holders of this Cham through the ensuing centuries. In this lifetime it was Umdze Thubten Sangpo who taught it to the 17th Karmapa.

    This terma or revealed treasure of Guru Chöwang is a combination of mind treasure and pure vision. The chanting of the text is a gom-ter or mind treasure. However, an oral tradition speaks of Guru Chöwang visiting the abode of Guru Rinpoche, known as the Copper Coloured Mountain or Zangdok Palri. There he saw the dakas and dakinis performing a dance. When he awoke, he recorded the movements of the dancers and it is this Cham or Vajra Dance that we will be watching on the tenth day.

    Guru Chöwang arranged the choreography and the chanting of the dance. As Lama Sangdu is the name of the revealed text, we could say that this is a Lama Sangdu Cham. To be allowed to perform the Vajra Dance, the monks are required to do the entire Lama Sangdu practice, including the creation and completion phase practices, as well as the chanting.

    There are 20 dances, and, significantly, no connecting story line. It is a recreation of the movements of the dancers as seen in the pure vision state of the treasure revealer. Thus there are no concepts to distract the mind.

    The performers and the audience both receive great benefit from the dance. It has the power to protect them and open the mind to positive activity. These positive imprints are known as liberation by seeing.

    To be able to witness this Vajra Dance performed by the 17th Karmapa, whose mind is so intermingled with Guru Rinpoche, that he is known as Guru Rinpoche himself, in the place of the Buddha's enlightenment, means that one has accumulated enormous merit. Because of this vast merit, wishes made on this day will be accomplished.

    In HH 17th Karmapa's words:

    We pray that by holding this puja along with the Vajra Lama dance,
    the teachings of Tibetan Buddhism may spread and flourish,
    that all declines in the environment and beings be pacified,
    that everyone in the world may be happy,
    and that all the people in the Noble Land of India,
    and in particular the state of Bihar and the sacred site of Bodhgaya,
    may be happy and prosperous,
    and I believe that this will come true.



    0 0



    An introduction

    For the first time, this year the Kagyu Monlam will be running a special veterinary camp which will provide skilled veterinary care for any animal in need. The vets will treat not just pets and domestic animals, but stray ones too. They will also focus on a street dog ABCAR programme [Animal Birth Control, Anti-Rabies].

    Sponsored by the Brigitte Bardot Foundation and with the assistance of the Sikkimese Government Department of Animal Husbandry, the camp will be staffed by a professional team of volunteer veterinarians.  For two weeks, the camp will transform part of the huge Garchen kitchen tent into an operating theatre, and hold an outpatients surgery on the Kagyu Monlam land behind Tergar Monastery.

    The camp will open on 22nd January, 2014. The last surgeries will be performed on 2nd February, but the camp will remain open for a further few days to ensure that animals receive any necessary follow-up care.

    The problem of rabies in India

    The World Health Organisation estimates that in India approximately 20,000 people each year die from rabies, and this is probably an underestimate as many deaths from rabies in rural or poverty-stricken areas are never recorded.  On the Indian sub-continent, an ever-increasing stray dog population is the main reservoir for rabies in animals and humans—96% of human rabies cases are caused by dog bites.  If somebody is bitten by a dog, there is effective treatment but as well as being very expensive so many people cannot afford it, it is often not available in poorer, rural areas.

    As most of the victims of rabies are children living these poorer, rural areas, it is extremely important to implement anti-rabies programmes in such areas.

    The recommended programme, which the team of vets will be introducing into the Bodhgaya area, is called ABCAR, and their aim will be to reduce the stray dog population in future and protect humans and animals from the danger of rabies.

    The ABCAR programme

    ABCAR stands for the Animal Birth Control (ABC) Programme and Anti-Rabies Vaccination Programme, which is a WHO (UN World Health Organisation) recommended programme for humane control of stray dogs and rabies transmission to humans.  

    The traditional method for controlling stray dogs and the spread of rabies in India has been catching and killing all street dogs, but this has proven to be unsuccessful all across the country.
    Because the population of street dogs is dependent on available food and space in a given environment, if street dogs are poisoned, killed or otherwise removed, the remaining population multiplies rapidly to fill the empty biological niche.  In addition, dogs from outside are able to infiltrate, bringing fresh infection.

    The traditional method is ineffective. It is expensive for municipal corporations, involves the gruesome killing of community dogs on the streets in front of children and the local population, and, most importantly, causes unimaginable cruelty to the animals themselves who are either poisoned, beaten to death with sticks, or shot.

    Under the ABCAR programme, stray dogs are caught humanely, spayed or neutered under anaesthetic in sterile conditions, given an anti-rabies vaccine, and then returned to the same area where they were captured.  The programme is highly effective in controlling both the dog population and rabies.  De-sexed and rabies vaccinated dogs will not breed but continue to protect their territories. This stops unvaccinated dogs from entering the area bringing the risk of rabies. It only takes 75% of the dog population to be desexed and vaccinated against rabies to break the rabies transmission cycle.

    Wherever this programme has been introduced in India, the number of rabies cases has plummeted dramatically, and, in some instances, been reduced to zero.




    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140109.html


    0 0





    31st Kagyu Monlam Chenmo - Webcast Schedule Indian Time

    The Torch of Certainty
    Teaching by His Holiness the Karmapa
    Januar 3 - 4 Morning Session 8:00 - 10:30 IST
    Afternoon Session 14:00 - 16:30 IST

    The empowerment for Jatsön Nyingpo’s Konchok Chidu ritual
    January 5 Morning Session 8:00 - 10:00 IST

    Garchen Tse Chu
    Guru Rinpoche Empowerment: Chöwang Lama Sangdü
    January 6 Morning Session 8:00 - 10:00 IST
    The Mind Practice of Guru Rinpoche: The Eight Chapters of Lama Sangdü and the Ritual of the Dharma Protector Shinkyong
    January 7-9 Session 1 No Webcast
    Session 2 No Webcast
    Session 3 No Webcast
    Session 4 No Webcast
    January 10 Session 1 No Webcast
    Session 2 No Webcast
    Lama Dancing Session 3 7:00 - 16:00 IST
    Session 4 No Webcast

    31st Kagyu Monlam Chenmo
    January 11 - Day 1
    Session 1 Mahayana Sojong, Twenty-Branch Monlam 6:00 - 8:30 IST
    Session 2 Teaching on The Eight Verses of Mind Training 9:00 - 11:00 IST
    Session 3 King of Aspirations, Maitreya’s Aspiration, Aspiration from The Way of the Bodhisattva, Sukhavati Prayer 13:30 - 15:00 IST
    Session 4 Twenty-Branch Monlam 15:30 - 17:00 IST
    January 12 - Day 2
    Session 1 Mahayana Sojong, Twenty-Branch Monlam 6:00 - 8:30 IST
    Session 2 Teaching on The Eight Verses of Mind Training 9:00 - 11:00 IST
    Session 3 Removal of Obstacles: Prayers to Tara and Saraswati 13:30 - 15:00 IST
    Session 4 Twenty-Branch Monlam 15:30 - 17:00 IST
    January 13 - Day 3
    Session 1 Mahayana Sojong; Medicine Buddha 6:00 - 8:00 IST
    Session 2 Reading the Kangyur 8:30 - 11:00 IST
    Session 3 Prayers for the Well-Being of Tibet 13:30 - 15:00 IST
    Session 4 Twenty-Branch Monlam 15:30 - 17:00 IST
    January 14 - Day 4
    Session 1 Mahayana Sojong, Twenty-Branch Monlam 6:00 - 8:30 IST
    Session 2 Alms Procession 9:00 - 11:00 IST
    Session 3 Akshobhya Ritual 13:30 - 15:00 IST
    Session 4 Twenty-Branch Monlam 15:30 - 17:00 IST
    Session 5 Akshobya Puja 17:00 - 0:00 IST
    January 15 - Day 5
    Session 1 Mahayana Sojong, Twenty-Branch Monlam, Ritual of the Sixteen Arhats 6:00 - 8:30 IST
    Session 2 Lama Chӧpa: Offerings to the Gurus 9:00 - 11:00 IST
    Session 3 Lama Chӧpa: Offerings to the Gurus 13:30 - 14:30 IST
    Session 4 Sponsor Appreciation; Special Address 15:00 - 17:00 IST
    January 16 - Day 6
    Session 1 Marme Monlam 19:00 - 21:00 IST



    0 0


    January 10,2014







    0 0





    The tenth and twenty-fifth days of the lunar month are significant times for practice. The outer reason is that according to tantric teachings, on these dates, the heroes and yoginis from the twenty four sacred sites naturally gather to bless the yogi. The inner reason is that the meditator’s subtle channels, winds, and essence drops naturally gather around the central channel on these dates, so they are a superior time for meditation. The secret reason is that if a yogi performs a puja with the particular samadhi of the secret mantra, there is especially great merit.

    Another reason why the tenth day is significant is its association with Guru Padmasambhava. Many in Tibet consider that Padmasambhava was extraordinarily kind to the Snow Land of Tibet. He himself said that in the future he will actually come on the tenth day of every lunar month to bless his followers.

    The History of the Tsechu Puja

    The Tsechu Lama dance arose 800 years ago from the pure visions of Guru Chöwang. There are long and short versions. The long is called the black hat dance, and the short the white horse dance.

    According to historical sources, this practice first came into the Kamtsang lineage at the time of the Eight Situ Panchen Chökyi Jungne, who instituted it at Palpung monastery. Later during the time of the Fourteenth Karmapa Tekchok Dorje, it was introduced Tsurphu Monastery, one of the seats of the Karmapa lineage. Situ Chökyi Jungne had learned the dance at Bentsang Monastery in Netong, so the present tradition is a continuation of the Netong tradition.

    In 1959, the Sixteenth Karmapa Rangjung Rigpe Dorje escaped to India, where he instituted the tradition of the Tsechu lama dance at Rumtek monastery, his seat in exile. Since then it has been preserved there in its entirety as a living tradition.

    The Nature of the Lama Dance

    This sacred lama dance with its long history and profound meaning is not like any ordinary dance one might perform. The essence or nature of the dance is recognizing that the nature of all phenomena is the union of appearance and emptiness. One’s body, speech, and mind no longer remain ordinary, and one visualizes oneself as the form of the deity. The dance becomes a way to express this to other people.

    The Purpose of the Dance

    When a powerful yogi performs the lama dance, he can directly affect the body, speech, and mind of the viewers. All sentient beings have buddha nature, but it is hidden by obscurations. The lama dance is a way to purify these obscurations. Through the samadhi of the three vajras, the expressions of the body, speech, and mind of the deity purify the dancer’s mental continuum. If the spectators, imagining and meditating on themselves as the deity, are also able to view it not as ordinary experience but as an expression of the deity, they will receive the blessings of the wisdom deities—it is no different than if the deities themselves actually came. Seeing the dance implants the seed of liberation within the viewer’s being.

    According to the Hevajra tantra, the dance eliminates the outer and inner obstacles of the dancers themselves as well as those of the spectators. The dancer gains influence over the world because all that appears and exists is sealed with the stamp of the deity. It is also said that one will easily accomplish the recitation of the deity’s mantra.




    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0



     Tergar Monastery, Bodhgaya, India
    January 3, 2014



    In the morning session the Gyalwang Karmapa had explored the meaning of taking refuge and described how to visualize the refuge tree. After lunch he resumed his exposition of the text, blending an oral transmission of Jamgön Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye’s commentary with his own insights and much practical advice.

    Only the Three Jewels are able rescue us from samsara.  How then can we test the depth and authenticity of our refuge for ourselves?

     First we can use the four measures:  
    1.     We need to be clearly aware of their unique attributes. This includes the qualities of body, speech, mind and activity.  The greatest and most immediate benefit for us comes from the qualities of the Buddha’s speech.  As to mind, the qualities of the Dharma are immeasurable because not only does it include the individual attributes of the Dharma of tradition and the Dharma of realization, but at the heart of the Dharma is the truth of the path and the truth of cessation. Ultimately, every good result  from our practice, such as higher rebirth and realisations, comes from the Dharma. The qualities of the Sangha are exemplified by Arya Bodhisattvas and Arya Shravakas.
    2.    We contemplate the differences between the Three Jewels – in nature, function and activity.
    3.    There are the distinct commitments we make to each of the Three  Jewels.  We accept the Buddha as our teacher, we accept the Dharma as a valid path, and we accept the Sangha as our guides and companions.
    4.    There are the abstentions that we vow to uphold: having taken refuge in the Buddha, we abstain from taking refuge in worldly deities.
    Having entrusted ourselves completely to the Three Jewels we do not seek refuge elsewhere. They provide both protection and support, but we should never view them as a temporary refuge.  Our ultimate aim is to attain the state of the Three Jewels ourselves, thus we need to go for refuge lifetime after lifetime until we achieve our goal.

    The Indian Buddhist tradition had a three-fold refuge of Buddha, Dharma and Sangha, but also a five-fold refuge which included the yidams and dharmapalas.  The story goes that because ancient Indian Buddhists had sharp faculties, they were very aware that one gains access to the Buddha through the guru and that the two are inseparable. But in Tibet, though there was great faith, Tibetans found it difficult to remember the unity of the guru and the Buddha so it was necessary to add going to refuge to the guru separately in the refuge vow, making a four-fold or six-fold refuge.

    Why is the guru seen as inseparable from the Buddha?  We often forget that the Buddha was a human being who attained enlightenment at Bodhgaya; we think of him as superhuman or god-like. In fact we are not always able to conceive of his qualities. The etymology of the word ‘guru’ suggests the meaning ‘weighty’, not in terms of size but in terms of positive attributes and great kindness. We see our guru as a human being and are able to see his or her qualities clearly. Using the analogy of the sun, the Karmapa explained the sun produces many different sorts of energy of which light is one form,  but human beings are  unable to see other parts such as X-rays. We only see what we have the capacity to see.

    If we rely authentically on the guru, then through the guru’s blessing, we may at some point develop to the point where we can find out for ourselves whether there is anything greater or not. But if we don’t rely upon the guru and spend our lives searching, looking for something better than the guru, we may simply fall in between. Having failed to rely on the guru, we don’t receive their blessing. Not finding the superior thing of which we dream, we don’t receive its blessing either.
    It is tempting to indulge in philosophical speculation over what constitutes the Three Jewels; however, if we are immersed fully in practice and want to foster virtue we should develop devotion as much as possible.  Any image of the Buddha is a focus of support for faith, as are stupas which represent the Buddha, and should be considered as aspects of the Buddha.  Dharma texts, and sangha members who keep ethical discipline should also be considered aspects of the Three Jewels, and one should go to them for refuge with faith and devotion.

    Refuge has to become part of our daily life and we need to develop an experiential feeling of refuge in our minds, having a clear visualization of the refuge tree is not enough. Nor is it sufficient to repeat the words of the refuge vow.  We need a strong, intense feeling of what refuge means.  For example we say we take refuge in the Dharma, but are we actually practising the Dharma? For instance, during the Monlam there’s a lot of gossip, and too much talk about the faults of others, complaining, and negative comparisons.  But if we have taken refuge in the Dharma we have a responsibility not to talk of another’s faults, but to talk of their virtues. As the Kagyu Monlam is a time when we try to improve ourselves rather than to cultivate negativity, His Holiness asked everyone to resolve to maintain ethical discipline in their speech and behavior in order to make the Monlam meaningful.  Of course we have faults, he admitted, we are just human beings, but the life tree of the Dharma is to focus on other’s virtues rather than their faults.

    When we rely on a spiritual friend, the sutras say that it is very difficult to find someone who is perfect, who lacks flaws, so it is sufficient to rely on a spiritual friend with the best qualities and the least flaws. We should be like bees, taking only the nectar from flowers and leaving the rest. We should focus on the good qualities of others and not their defects. We are trying to improve ourselves, increasing the virtues of our body, speech and mind. Paying attention to the good qualities of others will inspire us and we will develop a stronger faith, more devotion, and more love and compassion. This will be to our benefit.

    Even if someone has only the slightest virtue, you should perceive the quality as rare and as precious as the Buddha. If we take refuge in the Dharma and focus only on the defects of others, we are paying lip service to the Dharma. We do not afford enough respect to the living virtues of those around us. And in the case of someone we dislike, we dwell on their negative side and ignore any virtues they might have.

    For your refuge to qualify as a Mahayana refuge, it is of great importance to take refuge from now until enlightenment and to take it for all sentient beings as vast as space, and then it will be an authentic refuge.

    In addition, there are four attributes which make refuge truly authentic
    ·      An understanding of the qualities of the Three Jewels;
    ·      An understanding of the superiority of and difference between the Buddha and other lesser teachers, the Dharma and incorrect paths, and the Sangha as opposed to the communities of other traditions.
    ·      Having an unreserved commitment to the refuge based on an understanding of the superior qualities of the Three Jewels.
    ·      Never giving up the refuge vows, even at the cost of your own life.
    If we entrust ourselves without reservation to the Three Jewels, whatever difficulties we may encounter, even in lower rebirths, we will be protected. We re-enforce our commitment by contemplating the four recollections: their kindness, their compassion, the benefits of refuge, and the shortcomings of samsara,

    Finally, His Holiness observed that when people complete the first preliminary practice, they often do prostrations along with recitation of the refuge vows. Over time, the custom has become to count the prostrations, but this is not correct. It’s the number of repetitions of the refuge vows which counts.  People who cannot prostrate, because of physical difficulties can complete these preliminaries by reciting the refuge vow 100,000 times.




    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140103_teaching_2.html

    0 0


    January 5, 2014



    Below the magnificent thangka of Guru Rinpoche which towers above the Monlam Pavilion stage, a three-tiered altar runs the width of the thangka. Placed on the altar's top tier and visually joining the image of Guru Rinpoche above it with Karmapa's throne below, is the immense nine-foot Guru torma (sculpted offering), rising up from four tiers decorated with rows of blazing jewels. These four layers support two massive, inverted cones and a final torma, its triangular finial decorated with fully blossomed flowers. The giant torma stands in front of a brocade rectangle at the base of the thangka, where four pairs of swirling dragons seem ready to spring off into space.

    On the torma's right are the three red obelisks of the Maning tormas (a form of Mahakala), decorated with lush flowers; on the torma's left are the two large Shingkyong tormas surrounded by their retinue of ten. A large section of the practices to be done and one of the lama dances are devoted to this pair of male and female wisdom protectors, who guard Amitabha's pure land.


    To the left of the Shingkyong are the torma of the guardian Chedo and his retinue of twelve. A more worldly figure, he is important for the Nyingma tradition.


    Finally, directly before the main torma of Guru Rinpoche is a torma for the Mamos. Its shape looks very much like a woman wearing a long skirt, an image in tune with the female spirits to whom the torma is offered.




    0 0

    January 5, 2014



    Soon after the empowerment for the Embodiment of the Three Jewels concludes, preparations begin for the Tsechu, or Tenth Day practice, dedicated to Guru Rinpoche on this day of the lunar month.


    The Gyalwang Karmapa is back on the stage, this time as the director of operations, overseeing the display of an immense thirty-foot, applique thangka of Guru Rinpoche. Holding a vajra and skull cup, Guru Rinpoche is surrounded by Yeshe Tsogyal, Mandarava, and the Guru's eight manifestations, all of which figure in both the practice text of the Tsechu and the lama dancing which will be performed on the final day of the Tsechu, the tenth of the month.


    At the base of the thangka are the protectors Shingkyong and Maning, who are part of the practice as well.


    On loan from Situ Rinpoche, the brilliant presence of the thangka fills the entire space: the sheen of the material is radiant and the images vivid; each subtly outlined by a single strand of horsehair wrapped in silk, they seem to float in the air as the thangka reaches up to the lofty ceiling of the stage. The arch in front is draped with long, graceful swags in white, yellow, red, green, and blue, tied to the side like rainbow curtains, their colors the same as the katas attached to the offerings for a lama's long life.


    Turing around now to look at the main hall of the Pavilion that extends away from the stage, you can see monks preparing to hang two long rows of smaller, eight-foot thangkas that will run along either side of the main aisle. These stitched images depict the Golden Rosary of the Kagyu, an unbroken lineage of realized masters, beginning with the India mahasiddha Tilopa and descending through the Karmapas, their disciples, and teachers down to the 16th Karmapa who passed away in the United States in 1981. These two rows of bright thangkas are punctuated at the end by the cream white, giant circles of two drums, set in brown and gold-leafed frames.


    Completing the transformation are two long scrolls hung along the far walls on the right and left. They depict the miracles performed by the 5th Karmapa, Dezhin Shekpa, during the time he spent in China at the invitation of the emperor. These images show amazing displays of light coming from the Karmapa's residence and from the temple where the ceremonies were performed: golden light gushes from the buildings, rainbows arch above, clouds turn multicolored while Arhats nestle inside. Cranes fly through rays of light and flowers fall in a great shower. One could almost imagine that one day from this perfectly adorned Pavilion, rainbow lights might once more radiate through the sky, arcing toward the Mahabodhi stupa, its golden spire glistening in the distance.




    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140105.html

    0 0


    Tsechu Day 2
    January 8, 2014




    After the Konchok Chidu empowerment on January 5, over the loud speaker came the names of participants in the Tsechu. Traditionally, all the names are read, beginning with the Gyalwang Karmapa, his heart sons, other tulkus or reincarnate lamas, the khenpos, and so forth, but this year more than four thousand monks and nuns have come and there's not enough time. In the shrine hall, each category of the sangha has its own place, beginning with the forty tulkus and rinpoches who sit on the stage in rows near the thrones of Jamgön Kongtrul Rinpoche and Gyaltsap Rinpoche.


    Generally, monasteries are divided between monks who focus on performing the ritual ceremonies and those who focus on studying the great philosophical treatises. This division is reflected in the seating for the rest of the monks. At the head of the main aisle on the right is the Dorje Loppön, who is in charge of the shrine and the practice, and next to him are seven chant masters. The row of monks on the other side is led by the head khenpo from the Institute for Higher Buddhist Studies in Rumtek.  Filling the rest of the seats on either side of the central aisle are forty monks playing drums of soft green that stand on long brown handles as the row of rhythmic circles punctuate the space between the thangkas above and the low platform where the monks sit. The chanting is slow and spacious with time to reflect on the meaning; the music also moves at a stately pace, sometimes slowing down into pauses of silence. Everywhere in the shrine hall, one's eyes meet a pleasing feast of color and shape, all perfectly proportioned to the vast space and the burgundy sea of monks and nuns.


    The key element of the shrine preparation was added on January 8th, the second day of the practice. In the early morning, participants arrived to find the Karmapa's carved wood chair with its curving back covered in white silk, sitting in the middle of the stage, lined up directly below the image of Guru Rinpoche and between the thrones of Jamgön Rinpoche and Gyaltsap Rinpoche. This was rather puzzling because if the Karmapa were coming to the practice, he would have been sitting on a throne. Why, then, was the chair there?


    The riddle was soon, and surprisingly, solved. As the previous morning, the Karmapa came into the shrine hall with his usual long stride. Today, he first stopped at the tent for the television crew before he walked along a path between the long rows of maroon cushions. All of the paths had been precisely calculated the night before by a crew with tape measures. During the time that the Karmapa was moving in the shrine hall, a larger than life-size statue of Guru Rinpoche was carried onstage and placed on the white chair with a table and offerings set in front of him. The statue is perfectly sized to look like a magnificent Guru Rinpoche presiding over the practice. His face expresses an alert awareness and a slight smile. He wears a brocade cloak and the lotus hat whose peacock feathers seem to have just descended from above. At this time, the monks and nuns are chanting the extensive praises to the kayas, (bodies or dimensions), of Guru Rinpoche and his eight manifestations, which begin:


    Hung Hri. The lama's dharmakaya is unfabricated, free of mental constructs.

    The lama, Lord of Dharma, is the sambhogakaya of great bliss.






    http://kagyumonlam.org/English/News/Report/Report_20140108_Tsechu.html

    0 0




    The tenth and twenty-fifth days of the lunar month are significant times for practice. The outer reason is that according to tantric teachings, on these dates, the heroes and yoginis from the twenty four sacred sites naturally gather to bless the yogi. The inner reason is that the meditator’s subtle channels, winds, and essence drops naturally gather around the central channel on these dates, so they are a superior time for meditation. The secret reason is that if a yogi performs a puja with the particular samadhi of the secret mantra, there is especially great merit.

    Another reason why the tenth day is significant is its association with Guru Padmasambhava. Many in Tibet consider that Padmasambhava was extraordinarily kind to the Snow Land of Tibet. He himself said that in the future he will actually come on the tenth day of every lunar month to bless his followers.


    The History of the Tsechu Puja


    The Tsechu Lama dance arose 800 years ago from the pure visions of Guru Chöwang. There are long and short versions. The long is called the black hat dance, and the short the white horse dance.


    According to historical sources, this practice first came into the Kamtsang lineage at the time of the Eighth Situ Panchen Chökyi Jungne, who instituted it at Palpung monastery. Later during the time of the Fourteenth Karmapa Tekchok Dorje, it was introduced at Tsurphu Monastery, one of the seats of the Karmapa lineage. Situ Chökyi Jungne had learned the dance at Bentsang Monastery in Netong, so the present tradition is a continuation of the Netong tradition.


    In 1959, the Sixteenth Karmapa Rangjung Rigpe Dorje escaped to India, where he instituted the tradition of the Tsechu lama dance at Rumtek monastery, his seat in exile. Since then it has been preserved there in its entirety as a living tradition.


    The Nature of the Lama Dance


    This sacred lama dance with its long history and profound meaning is not like any ordinary dance one might perform. The essence or nature of the dance is recognizing that the nature of all phenomena is the union of appearance and emptiness. One’s body, speech, and mind no longer remain ordinary, and one visualizes oneself as the form of the deity. The dance becomes a way to express this to other people.


    The Purpose of the Dance


    When a powerful yogi performs the lama dance, he can directly affect the body, speech, and mind of the viewers. All sentient beings have buddha nature, but it is hidden by obscurations. The lama dance is a way to purify these obscurations. Through the samadhi of the three vajras, the expressions of the body, speech, and mind of the deity purify the dancer’s mental continuum. If the spectators, imagining and meditating on themselves as the deity, are also able to view it not as ordinary experience but as an expression of the deity, they will receive the blessings of the wisdom deities—it is no different than if the deities themselves actually came. Seeing the dance implants the seed of liberation within the viewer’s being.


    According to the Hevajra tantra, the dance eliminates the outer and inner obstacles of the dancers themselves as well as those of the spectators. The dancer gains influence over the world because all that appears and exists is sealed with the stamp of the deity. It is also said that one will easily accomplish the recitation of the deity’s mantra.




    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!

older | 1 | .... | 15 | 16 | (Page 17) | 18 | 19 | .... | 86 | newer