Quantcast
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog



older | 1 | .... | 13 | 14 | (Page 15) | 16 | 17 | .... | 86 | newer

    0 0






















    0 0



    Picture by  Tulku Ogyen Nyima


    English translation by Ken Holmes:


    Köncho tsasum jamtsö chintop tang
    Lalop dédam tsangmay tendrel ji
    Tendrö palgön yangtrul nyinmor chay
    Dulchay döndu laryang char war sho

    Through the blessing power of an ocean of the Three Jewels and the Three Roots
    And that of the interdependence of pure faith and pure samaya of lama and follower,
    May the shining daylight of this magnificent guide and protector of the teachings and of beings
    Rise as a new incarnation to shine once again, thus bringing benefit to those to be trained.



    This “swift return” prayer for Chöjé Akong Tulku Rinpoché was composed by the Karmapa Orgyen Trinley on the 16th of October 2013 according to the heartfelt requests of his disciples and many others.



    0 0




























    0 0


    A completely new calendar is due to be published this summer, focusing on the global environment, with an introduction and quotations contributed by His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, the leader of the Kagyu lineage in Tibetan Buddhism. His Holiness’ keen interest and concern for the environment  is well known, and he has spoken and written extensively on environmental issues, as well as establishing Khoryug (www.khoryug.com) with the aim of restoring the natural environment in the Himalayas and Tibet, and especially to protect the region’s forests, water and wildlife.

    The calendar will be 12 inches (305mm) square, with beautiful images from around the world, and a generous monthly grid. It will be produced in a totally sustainable, carbon neutral process, and will have international distribution. The proceeds from publishing this calendar will be donated to projects and charities selected by the Karmapa, and we are already to starting to  plan calendars for future years. The 2014 calendar will be available to buy online from this website, and publication will be announced as soon as the date is confirmed.



    0 0


    Oct. 23, 2013


    Gyalwang Karmapa arrives for the celebrations/TCV school football field/Oct. 23, 2013, phayul photo/Kunsang
    http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?article=TCV+observes+53rd+founding+anniversary&id=34141

    Tibetan Buddhist leader, the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje attends the annual function at the Tibetan Children's Village School in Dharmsala. (AP Photo)

    Tibetan Buddhist leader, the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, left, watches a program with Prime Minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile Lobsang Sangay at the Tibetan Children's Village School during the school's annual function in Dharmsala . (AP Photo)

    Tibetan Buddhist leader, the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, left, watches a program with Prime Minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile Lobsang Sangay at the Tibetan Children's Village School during the school's annual function. (AP Photo)



    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    23 October 2013 – Upper TCV, Dharamsala


    Marking the 53rd Anniversary of the founding of the Tibetan Children’s Village School in Upper Dharamsala, today the Gyalwang Karmapa was guest of honor at a day of public celebrations. The school educates and raises young Tibetan refugee children, many with parents and families remaining in Tibet, and is currently home to around 2000 students and staff.
    The Gyalwang Karmapa arrived around 9am, escorted by the school’s marching band, and took his seat on the balcony overlooking the outdoor arena. Shortly afterwards he was joined by Dr Lobsang Sangye, the Sikyong or Prime Minister of the Tibetan Government-In-Exile, while several thousand people filled the seats below.
    Throughout the morning the Gyalwang Karmapa watched with enjoyment as the students offered a range of performances. The program began with a march-past of the entire student body, followed by the Tibetan and Indian national anthems and a minute’s silence in respect for those who have lost their lives in the Tibetan struggle.
    After several speeches the school’s marching band then kicked off the student performances with an energetic drum piece. This was followed by a poignant song offered by the junior students on the theme of missing their parents back in Tibet, and remembering their great kindness. Next students offered a song and dance performance featuring vibrant costumes from the south-west region of Tibet.
    The culmination of the morning’s program was a calisthenics display by 900 middle and senior students. Their simultaneous movements and precise arrangements created a striking effect, particularly when the students spread out and arranged themselves into large formations of words and symbols such as ‘Spread Love and Compassion’, ‘We Salute Our Martyrs’, and a symbol of the ‘Scales of Ethics’.
    After enjoying lunch and paying a visit to the school’s Art Museum, the Gyalwang Karmapa then left to visit the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala, where he spent time reading and researching with texts held there.



    http://kagyuoffice.org/anniversary-celebrations-at-the-tibetan-childrens-village/

    0 0


    The Delhi High Court has stayed the deportation notice of Lodro Chokyi Nyima
     who had been asked to go back to Tibet by the Union government


    Delhi High Court delays government's attempt to deport Buddhist monk





    The Delhi High Court has come to the rescue of Lodro Chokyi Nyima, the fourth re-incarnation of Karmapa Jamgon Kongtrul, who has been asked by the Centre to go back to Tibet.

    The HC has stayed the deportation notice for now and has sought a response from the Centre as to why it wants to extradite the monk to Tibet where there is threat to his life.

    Nyima's biological parent sneaked him into India from Tibet in 1997 when he was only two years old.
    The parents feared "political misconceptions of the Chinese Government" after the Dalai Lama revealed that Nyima was the fourth re-incarnation of the Karmapa.

    Nyima was taken in by the monks at the Rumtek Monastery in Sikkim and adopted by a local couple.
    He has since been living in the country with his parents as an Indian citizen.

    Passport row

    As per the records submitted before the HC, the Central Tibetan Administration had consented to the adoption.

    A passport was issued to Nyima in 2006 and he even travelled to the US on the same.

    However, in 2007, the Centre sent a letter to Nyima and his adoptive mother Kunzang L Chungyalpa informing them that the monk's passport was being revoked as he had not entered India lawfully.

    The letter from the Ministry of Home Affairs further said that Nyima could not be granted India citizenship by virtue of adoption as the process did not fulfil statutory conditions as per Section 4 of the Citizenship Act.

    Nyima and his parents reapplied for citizenship citing the adoption documents affirmed by the Sikkim government and the Tibetan authorities.

    The application, however, was rejected by MHA. In 2009, the family approached the HC through senior advocates Ram Jethmalani and D.K. Thakur seeking relief.

    The counsels contended that Nyima's adoption could not be challenged as the parents had followed all state norms, and on the basis of the adoption papers he was entitled to all citizenship rights.

    The court took a note of the fact that the Central Tibetan Administration had consented to the petitioner's adoption and stayed his deportation till further orders.

    "The fact remains that he was issued a passport in 2006 that was later revoked. Concededly, he has been residing in India, all this while.Having regard to these circumstances, the court is of the opinion that till the next date of hearing, no coercive steps should be taken to deport the petitioner," the court said in a previous hearing.

    It has sought a detailed synopsis of the matter from both parties by the month-end and fixed the matter for hearing in December this year.



    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome/indianews/article-2477068/Delhi-High-Court-delays-governments-attempt-deport-Buddhist-monk.html#ixzz2iuFiX5Bm
    Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook




    0 0




    THE SIXTEENTH GYALWANG KARMAPA, RANGJUNG RIGPE DORJE
    Who was this extraordinary individual with the spiritual signs of a buddha, the Sixteenth Karmapa, Holder of the Black Crown?
    Norma Levine has travelled to Tibet, India, Europe and North America to record the stories of this memorable man and the impact he had on the people who met him.
    His Holiness was the greatest enlightened lama I ever met… Many lamas of his time were in awe of his all-seeing wisdom, endless compassion, and his prodigious powers of clairvoyance and prognostication, particularly his obvious ability to see through people.
    Lama Surya Das: Buddhist writer and teacher
    This book gives us a rare and intimate insight into the personality of the man who was the 16th Karmapa.  His mere presence, akin to a powerful force of nature, would deeply affect those around him;  his cosmic laughter, like a lion’s roar proclaiming supremacy, could be heard streets away. He was able to teach anywhere, at any time, when the moment was right and was followed wherever he went by his beloved entourage of birds who travelled with him and sang his mantra: Karmapa Kyenno, Master of Activity, Be With Me.
    This book offers the stories of Western students and prominent reincarnate Lamas who had meaningful contact with the 16th Karmapa in both India and the West. In the context of the freedom and spontaneity of Western culture in the 1960s, the profound mind transmission of this remarkable Master transformed the lives of those whom he encountered. Each story is a spiritual adventure; vibrant, authentic, sometimes shocking, but always inspiring.
    Norma Levine is a lifelong Buddhist practitioner and the author of Blessing Power of the Buddhas: Sacred Objects, Sacred Lands; A Yearbook of Buddhist Wisdom; and Chronicles of Love and Death: My Years with the Lost Spiritual King of Bhutan.

     Available from 15 December 2013


    0 0









    0 0



    Gyalwang Karmapa will teach on:
    The Three Principal Aspects of the Path.
    This concise lamrim text was composed by Je Tsongkhapa, explains how the desire to be free from cyclic existence, developing the altruistic intention, and realizing the wisdom of emptiness constitute the three principal aspects of the path to enlightenment.






    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0




    1-2 November 2013 – Habitat Centre, New Delhi

    At the invitation of the Foundation for Universal Responsibility of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, on 1 November 2013 the Gyalwang Karmapa began two-day teachings at the Habitat Centre, New Delhi.

    The Gyalwang Karmapa offers these teachings annually to a small group of students, comprised mostly of his local Indian devotees. Teaching this year on Je Tsongkhapa’s Lamrim text ‘The Three Principal Aspects of the Path,’ he guided those gathered through the essential aspects of the Mahayana path to enlightenment – renunciation, bodhicitta, and wisdom.

    With almost 300 people in attendance at the Silver Oak room, many of whom were seated on soft cushions at the Gyalwang Karmapa’s feet, the close and intimate atmosphere of the teachings resembled a gathering of family and friends. Registration to attend was booked out weeks in advance with a long wait-list, so this year the teachings were also broadcast live via webcast. Over 1300 viewers from across the world tuned into the live webcast, which was also offered with Spanish and Chinese translation.

    As he taught the first two of the principal aspects of the path to enlightenment, renunciation and bodhicitta, the Gyalwang Karmapa explored how our apathy towards suffering damages the world.

    “Apathy is a state that we give rise to when we witness the suffering of others and know about it, but we simply don’t care,” he said. “Scientists tell us that compassion is actually hard-wired in our brains, that compassion is innate within us. The problem however is that we learn how to switch it off. As we become familiar with and then jaded toward the sight of others’ suffering, we learn how to simply turn our compassion off and not feel it.”

    “What enables the gross suffering that is present in this world to continue is our apathy—our ability to turn off our compassion. Apathy is a world-killer. We think of world-killers as epidemic diseases like malaria and so on. But in fact the worst world-killer is apathy, the absence of love and compassion, which is something that we see in the world around us.”

    The Gyalwang Karmapa then likened the first two aspects of the path, renunciation and bodhicitta, to being two sides of the same coin of compassion. The desire for our own personal freedom from samsara – or renunciation – is compassion facing inwards, while the desire that all other beings become free from samsara – or bodhicitta – is compassion facing outwards.
    “Compassion is much more than mere empathy or sympathy,” he emphasized. “Real compassion is literally putting yourself in another’s place, pouring your self, your whole body, brains and all, into their entire situation, and feeling as intensely about their wellbeing as they do. Real compassion is when you want others’ happiness as intensely as they want their own happiness.”

    With the second day of the teachings falling on a major Indian festival day, the Gyalwang Karmapa began the next morning by offering Diwali greetings to his Indian friends among those gathered.

    After giving an advanced and profound teaching on the third of the three principal aspects of the path, correct understanding of emptiness, the Gyalwang Karmapa then offered the empowerment of Amitabha and the pure realm of Sukhavati. In a beautiful and sacred ceremony, those gathered first recited the liturgy of the Refuge and Bodhisattva Vows before the Gyalwang Karmapa conferred the powerful blessing.



    http://kagyuoffice.org/teaching-the-path-to-enlightenment-at-the-habitat-centre/

    0 0



    [Voice of Tibet November 2, 2013] reported that the Dalai Lama should be charitable foundation in New Delhi's invitation, the seventeenth Karmapa Rinpoche from yesterday (the 1st) began in the capital New Delhi to the Indian Buddhist believers based Tsongkhapa taught in the book "three major road" and to teach the faithful Amitabha initiation.
    (Recording) in yesterday's law at the Karmapa Rinpoche humorously said that a lot of people here today, the Dalai Lama has repeatedly before too Dharma seat, and I always thought I was a very argument embarrassing things, but also a very solemn thing, argument with the Buddha's wisdom in the hearts of believers in order to teach the Dharma, but I personally did not have such a morality, but encountered a last resort as it is today, had ventured taught Dharma I hope everyone here follow the Buddha, "according to failing people" teachings, failing argument who can benefit from the Buddhist teachings of their ancestors.
    Next, the Karmapa Rinpoche to briefly introduce the faithful Tsongkhapa's great performance, we began to lecture on "three main road."(Recording) Karmapa Rinpoche said Tsongkhapa is late 14th early 15th century a great Tibetan great minds, is the founder of the Gelug Sect of Tibetan four major sects, Tsongkhapa Tibetan Buddhism Reform has made ​​a great contribution. First: the first advocate precepts revival of Tibetan Buddhism monks strict discipline; Second: unifying the Sharia doctrine, formulated to be a faction of meso authentic. Puja organizers Dalai Lama Charitable Foundation Project Leader Dan Tsewang map to this station resident, told reporters that (recording) for three consecutive years the Foundation has been invited to preach Karmapa Rinpoche activities were held, but this method The main object will pass laws for the Indian believers.

    According to reports, during the two-day puja, the first day (November 1) Karmapa Rinpoche to teach the faithful Tsongkhapa book "three major road", the next day to teach Amitabha initiations. From Hong Kong, Taiwan, Germany, Singapore, China and India over the faithful to come to listen to more than 250 laws.

    0 0



    6 November 2013 – Vivekananda International Foundation, New Delhi
    Speaking at the launch of a major new book titled ‘Tibet: Perspectives and Prospects’, edited by Prabhat P. Shukla, the Gyalwang Karmapa spoke of the profound and important relationship between the Tibetan and Indian nations.
    “Because Tibetan dharma and Tibetan culture both come from India, it is important for us as Tibetans to appreciate what we have received from India and our tremendous and long-standing debt, both spiritual and cultural, to this country,” he said. “It is important for us to recognize that as Tibetans partaking of Tibetan dharma and culture, we are in a sense the children of India—that India is the mother of Tibetan culture and dharma.”
    “The relationship between India and Tibet is not recent, and it is not temporary. It is a very profound relationship, more than one thousand years old. It is not merely political, it is not expedient, and it is not merely economic. It is the deepest possible relationship. It is a spiritual and cultural relationship that really reaches to the very depths of what it means to be Tibetan. This relationship is so important because it goes to the very essence of the identity of the Tibetan people, their dharma, and their culture. So therefore, the issue of Tibet is very much an issue that is especially relevant to India.”
    Special guests at the book launch included Ajit Doval and Vijay Kranti, as well as the book’s editor, Ambassador Prabhat P. Shukla. ‘Tibet: Perspectives and Prospects’ is published by the Vivekananda International Foundation and Aryan Books International.


    0 0







    8 November 2013 – India International Centre, New Delhi

    Today the Gyalwang Karmapa launched the 5th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries and Nunneries in the Himalayas.

    Khoryug, which means ‘environment’ in Tibetan, is a network of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and nunneries working under the guidance of the Gyalwang Karmapa, and in association with the World Wildlife Fund Sacred Earth program, to protect the fragile Himalayan environment. 

    Around 60 monks and nuns representing 50 Himalayan monasteries and nunneries in India, Nepal and Bhutan are participating in the five-day Khoryug Conference at the India International Centre, with theme of ‘Conservation of Freshwater Resources in the Himalayas.’ Throughout the week the monastics will be educated on all the various aspects of water systems and their preservation, ready to return as environmental leaders to their respective communities.

    On his arrival at the conference the Gyalwang Karmapa first lit the customary lamp, and then made a special water-bowl offering before a statue of the Buddha – a reflection of both the scientific theme of the conference, as well as the spiritual inspiration behind it.

    “I am delighted to be able to hold this conference,” he told those gathered, “especially since I think that everyone who participates should be left with a very clear understanding not only of the tremendous importance of the environment but also of the environmental emergency in which we find ourselves.” 

    “I hope that over these five days of lengthy and frank discussions, we will all leave with a better idea of the best practices we can all follow to contribute to the conservation of our water resources—as individuals in our day-to-day life, as monasteries and as a human community.”

    The Chief Guest at the opening session, Shri Jairam Ramesh, who is the Honorable Union Minister of Rural Development and former Union Minister of Environment and Forests, also addressed those gathered. 

    “You are poised to play a very important role in disseminating the knowledge of the environmental threats,” Shri Ramesh told the assembled monks and nuns, “and also in bringing together institutions in different countries in our region to launch a cohesive and unified challenge.”

    Throughout the first day of the conference a range of distinguished speakers delivered sessions on the freshwater theme, including: Tenzin Norbu, Director of the Environment & Development Desk at the Central Tibetan Administration; Dr Dipankar Ghose, WWF India; Dr Suresh Rohilla, Centre of Science and Environment; Dr Sarala Khaling, Regional Director at Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment; and Dekila Chungyalpa, Director of the Sacred Earth program at the World Wildlife Fund USA, who is also moderating the conference. 

    Reflecting the diversity among participants, sessions were delivered in a combination of English, Tibetan, Hindi and Nepali languages, while topics covered on the first day included the water cycle, ecosystems, biodiversity, and food webs. During the afternoon session the monks and nuns broke into small working groups of 4-5 people, where they explored the water resources and water situation in their own monasteries and nunneries.

    The Gyalwang Karmapa is well-known for his keen interest and strong commitment to environmental protection. By skillfully using the great respect that is accorded to him as a spiritual leader throughout the Himalayan region, the Gyalwang Karmapa is uniquely placed to provide inspiration, motivation, and enlightened leadership amongst local communities in protecting the fragile Himalayan environment. In his role as chair of Khoryug, and through the initiatives developed during the annual Khoryug Conference, the Gyalwang Karmapa’s environmental influence extends throughout the Himalayas.


    http://kagyuoffice.org/5th-khoryug-conference-on-environmental-protection-begins/

    0 0


    Anjana Pasricha
    November 08, 2013

    FILE - The Himalayan range is seen in this aerial view taken from an aircraft flying over Nepal.
    In background is the Tibetan Plateau.

    NEW DELHI — Representatives of about 50 Buddhist monasteries are in the Indian capital to discuss fresh water conservation and preservation of the fragile ecosystem in the high Himalayan ranges and the Tibetan plateau.

    Tibetan spiritual leader Ogyen Trinley Dorje says studies show that the entire world faces an environmental emergency, but in the case of Tibet and all of Asia this is a “very immediate emergency.”

    Speaking to VOA in New Delhi, he said, “Among particular concerns I think the unprecedented amount of development in Tibet is causing serious pollution of water sources and also of course the melting of the glaciers and permafrost caused by climate change are immediate source of threat to Tibet, Tibetan water and therefore to all of Asia which gets much of its water from the Tibetan plateau.”

    Tibetan spiritual leader the 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje speaks to the Associated Press
    about the role of world citizens in environmental protection, in New Delhi, India, Nov. 8, 2013.

    The 28-year-old Dorje is the embodiment of the Karmapa Lama and is tipped to assume the mantle of Tibetan spiritual leadership after the life of the present Dalai Lama.

    He is in New Delhi for a five-day conference on fresh water conservation being attended by monks and nuns from about 50 Buddhist monasteries scattered across the Himalayas in India and Nepal. He has not involved himself with political issues concerning Tibet, and has retained a low profile since fleeing Tibet in 2000.  But the environment is one of the issues he is espousing.

    The conference, which began Friday, (5th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries and Nunneries in the Himalayas) has been organized by the World Wildlife Fund and Khoryug, a network of 50 Buddhist monasteries.

    It is highlighting problems like desertification of grasslands, drying up of lakes and river systems, and dislocation of pastoral nomads in the Tibetan plateau and other Himalayan regions.

    The Buddhist monks and nuns will be taught how to protect local water sources and how to recharge groundwater using techniques like rainwater harvesting. Organizers hope they will go home to create awareness in local communities and also get the message across to monasteries in Tibet, with whom they often have connections.

    Tenzin Norbu, Director of Environment and Development in the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala, said, “Whey they go back, they should respect the value of the water. Since most of these are from the Himalayan area which is connected to the Tibetan plateau, they should know the importance of the place where they came from, so that they can also create local awareness on how important it is to protect the Himalayan glaciers.”

    In New Delhi, Dorje has also compared the relationship between Tibet and India, where Buddhism originated, to that of a mother and child. Speaking through a translator, he called on Indians to retain that bond.

    “What is of great importance in the present is that the people of India recognize the tremendous profundity and the ancient source of their connection with Tibet," said Dorje. "This connection is not superficial, it is not simply political, it is environmental and cultural and it is a connection on the level of the heart that is very, very ancient. So it is important that as many people as possible come to understand the depth of this connection and also understand that for Tibetans who have left Tibet such as the Dalai Lama and countless others, India has been our soul, our only place of hope and refuge.”

    Dorje says that the Buddhist value of contentment could play a role in preserving the environment by countering consumerism, which he says is exhausting the Earth’s resources.


    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!
    0 0


    Phayul[Saturday, November 09, 2013 12:14]



    New Delhi, November 8: Shri Jairam Ramesh, Union Minister for Rural Development and former Union Minister for Environment and Forests, inaugurated the 5th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries and Nunneries at the India International Centre today. 


    Chaired by the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, the five-day conference aims to educate Buddhist monks and nuns to take a leading role in their local communities in conserving freshwater resources across the Himalayas. With many glaciers retreating across the Tibetan plateau, the future of freshwater on the planet’s third pole will have great impact on water security across the Himalayan region and Indian subcontinent.


    Jairam Ramesh, union minister for rural development,
    at the opening ceremony of the conference

    Under the auspices of His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, Khoryug is a network of over 50 Buddhist monasteries and centers working together on environmental protection of the Himalayan region, with the aim of practically applying the values of compassion and interdependence towards the Earth and all living beings that dwell in the region. In association with WWF Sacred Earth, which provides technical expertise and support, Khoryugpartners with local organizations to inspire and educate local communities to protect all forms of life on Earth now and for the future. 

    In his inaugural address, Shri Jairam Ramesh commended the regional approach taken byKhoryug, noting that glacial areas and waterways cross national boundaries and thus an international approach is necessary to protects them. “You are poised to play a very important role in disseminating the knowledge of the environmental threats,” he told the assembled monks and nuns. 

    Ramesh remarked that Buddhist teachings themselves are an important source of inspiration for environmental activism in India. “Much of the veneration that Indians have for nature comes from our long and glorious Buddhist heritage. In fact, it would not be an exaggeration to say that both Buddhism and even Jainism have contributed to our consciousness on preservation of nature, respect for biodiversity, respect for conservation and respect for life in all its forms.” He lauded the Khoryug Guidelines as offering a blueprint for how monasteries can actually become demonstrated life examples of sustainable development.

    Shri Jairam Ramesh’s opening discourse was followed by reports from Tenzin Norbu, Director of the Environment and Development Desk within the Central Tibetan Administration, and Dipankar Ghose, director at WWF-India and Dr. Suresh Rohilla, head of the sustainable water management area at the Centre of Science and Environment. The 17th Karmapa later addressed the gathering and will chair the conference through the next few days. 

    The young head of the Kagyu tradition of the Tibetan Buddhism said, “I am delighted to be able to hold this conference, especially since I think that everyone who participates should be left with a very clear understanding not only of the tremendous importance of the environment but also of the environmental emergency in which we find ourselves. I hope that over these fives days of lengthy and frank discussions, we will all leave with a better idea of the best practices we can all follow to contribute to the conservation of our water resources — as individuals in our day-to-day life, as monasteries and as a human community.”

    The conference is facilitated by WWF Sacred Earth, which has advised and coordinatedKhoryug activities in the last few years. Dekila Chungyalpa, program director of WWF Sacred Earth, said, “Today, more than 50 senior Buddhist monks and nuns from across the Himalayas have come together to determine how they can protect freshwater resources in their regions. It is voices like theirs that we most need to make freshwater conservation a universal issue.”


    0 0


    Last Updated: Saturday, November 09, 2013, 15:48 





    New Delhi: Union Rural Development Minister Jairam Ramesh Friday called for a conservation mechanism that balances both human aspiration and bio-diversity, emphasising that unchecked consumer expansion would be a recipe for ecological disaster. 

    The challenge was to find ways to fulfill development aspirations while protecting natural resources at the same time, Ramesh said at the 5th Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection for Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries and Nunneries in New Delhi. 

    "We should have conservation that marries human aspirations with the imperative of respecting bio-diversity. The challenge is how to fulfil those aspirations while protecting water resources and forests and ensuring that the fragile balance of nature does not get disturbed," he said. 

    The minister said that he was against "unbridled consumer expansion" because that would be a "recipe for ecological disaster as resources are indeed finite". 

    Khoryug is a pan-Himalayan organisation founded by the 17th Karmapa with the aim of applying the values of compassion and interdependence in the area of community-based environmental protection. 

    Ramesh, a former environment minister, said: "It is beyond doubt that most of the glaciers are actually retreating. This has great impact on water security in the entire Himalayan basin. This is an issue of paramount significance for us in India." 

    He commended the regional approach taken by Khoryug. 

    "You are poised to play a very important role in disseminating the knowledge of the environmental threats," Ramesh said. 

    He said Buddhist teachings themselves are an important source of inspiration for environmental activism in India. 

    "Much of the veneration that Indians have for nature comes from our long and glorious Buddhist heritage. In fact, it would not be an exaggeration to say that both Buddhism and even Jainism has contributed to our consciousness on preservation of nature, respect for bio-diversity, respect for conservation and respect for life in all its forms," he added. 

    The Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, said: "I think that everyone who participates should be left with a very clear understanding not only of the tremendous importance of the environment but also of the environmental emergency in which we find ourselves." 

    "At the end, we will have a better idea of the best practices we can all follow to contribute to the conservation of our water resources -- as individuals in our day-to-day life, as monasteries and as a human community," he said. 




    IANS
    First Published: Saturday, November 09, 2013, 15:48

    http://zeenews.india.com/news/eco-news/need-to-balance-development-and-bio-diversity-jairam-ramesh_888822.html

    0 0



    Eastern Tibet

    1600 - 1699

    Karma (Kagyu) Lineage

    124.46x82.55cm (49x32.50in)

    Ground Mineral Pigment, Fine Gold Line on Cotton

    Karma Gardri Painting School

    Collection of Shelley & Donald Rubin

    (acc.# P1994.27.1)
     


    Gazing to the side, he holds the right hand up to the heart in a gesture of Dharma explication and the left in the lap holds a folio religious text wrapped in a white and green cloth cover. The head is adorned with the black vajra crown, a synthesis of the gift of the dakinis and the offering of Emperor Yung Lo. Attired in the orange and yellow garb of a monk, he is wrapped in a red meditation cloak, seated above a monk's mat and a blue cushion atop an ornate throne with a green cushion backrest. In front on a red table is a gold pitcher filled with flowers, a Dharma wheel ornament and an ornate bowl giving rise to a stream of vapour becoming a great mass of white billowing clouds supporting a heavenly scene with palaces, teachers and gods of various colour.

    Standing at the left side an elderly monk respectfully covers his mouth with a fold of his yellow patchwork robe as he listens to the instructions from the emanation of Avalokiteshvara - Karmapa. At the lower front two seated monks engaged in the moment gesture dramatically.

    At the top left is Vajra Amitayus, slightly peaceful and slightly wrathful, red in colour, with three faces, the right white and left blue. With six hands the first pair holds a long-life vase in the lap. The second pair holds a flower lasso on the right and with the left resting against the thigh holds the stem of a white lotus flower blossoming above the shoulder. The third pair holds in the right an upraised curved knife and a white skullcup in the left. Adorned with gold, jewels and blue and green silks, he is seated atop a white moon disc and pink lotus flower, surrounded by a green-blue nimbus and a jade green areola; drifting on a bank of white cloud.

    At the bottom right is the wrathful protector Yama Dharmaraja, blue in colour, with a buffalo head. With three eyes, a gaping mouth and two horns, his yellow hair flows upward like flames. The right hand holds aloft a red stick with a white skull at the top, decorated with a red ribbon. The left hand holds out to the side a lasso. Adorned with a crown of five skulls, a green scarf, snakes and necklace of freshly severed heads, he stands atop a black buffalo, sun disc and white lotus seat surrounded by dark billowing smoke.

    Recognized by Situ Rinpoche and enthroned by Shamar Rinpoche, this Karmapa spent most of his life living in a tent city travelling back and forth across the wilds of Tibet. Well educated and a moderately prolific writer, two of his more important compositions on mahamudra were the 'Ocean of Certainty' and 'Eliminating the Darkness of Ignorance.' One of his more famous students was Jonang Taranatha. (The names of the three main figures are written in fine gold lettering beneath each).

    Jeff Watt 9-99

    Front of Painting
    Wylie Transliteration of Inscription: tse dpag me ba dzra ... , rje dbang phug do ... , 'jig phed ...












    0 0



    11 November 2013 – Yamuna River, New Delhi
    On the 4th day of the Khoryug Conference on Environmental Protection the Gyalwang Karmapa, together with 60 monastic representatives from across the Himalayan region, left the conference table and headed out into the field.
    After spending the previous three days training in a range of water problems and their practical solutions relating to the conference theme of ‘Conservation of Freshwater Resources in the Himalayas’, the participants were then exposed to examples of such water problems and solutions in the real world.
    Heading over to a site on the Yamuna River in east Delhi, the Gyalwang Karmapa joined the monastics for a short river-blessing ceremony in the afternoon.
    The Yamuna River is considered sacred, with its source at Yamunotri in the Himalayas being one of the holiest Hindu pilgrimage sites. And yet, paradoxically, the river is also ecologically considered a ‘dead’ river, heavily polluted and in some places barely flowing due to human interruption of its natural course.
    At one of the river’s more polluted sections the Gyalwang Karmapa was met by Manoj Misra, Director of the Yamuna Jiye Abhiyaan organization that is dedicated to restoring the river. Standing together on its banks with the gathered monks and nuns, the Gyalwang Karmapa led prayers for the wellbeing of all living beings dependent on the river—from its pure Himalayan source right down to where it flows into the great Ganges river.
    This act of blessing once more symbolized the Gyalwang Karmapa’s joining of spiritual inspiration with environmental activism, and reflects his understanding that environmental protection begins with changing our attitudes towards the planet. The Gyalwang Karmapa’s environmental activities also reflect his single intention to protect and benefit all living beings through both traditional and modern methods.
    With waste and litter visibly coating the surface of the water and a strong odor permeating the air, the conference participants next listened as an elderly local farmer, who has spent his entire life living next to the river, described being able to drink directly from its once-pure waters when he was a small boy—driving home the message of our profound human impact upon the environment.
    Earlier that morning the monastic representatives had also visited the Centre for Science and Environment, one of India’s leading environmental NGOs. The group toured the sophisticated rainwater-harvesting and waste-water treatment systems in place at the centre, which are composed of all-natural filters and methods, and received detailed training on these water systems. Plans are underway for the Centre for Science and Environment to partner with Khoryug members to introduce similar rainwater-harvesting and waste-water treatment systems into their own monasteries in the future.


    http://kagyuoffice.org/khoryug-conference-gyalwang-karmapa-blesses-the-yamuna-river/

    0 0


    November 12, 2013, 3:32 am

    Dalai Lama potential successor tells China to clean up Tibet       AFP

    New Delhi (AFP) - A potential successor to the Dalai Lama Monday warned that Chinese military installations and other projects in Tibet could have disastrous environmental consequences for Asia.
    Urgyen Trinley urged India to voice its concerns over Chinese development activities in his Himalayan home country.
    "During the more than 50 years since China took over Tibet, there has been a great deal of development and activity including military installations by the Chinese that have impacted the Tibetan environment," Trinley told AFP.
    "The fact China has control of Tibet does not mean they have the right to do whatever they want to the Tibetan environment," Trinley, who fled Tibet to India in 2000, said.
    India, which fought a brief but bloody border war with its giant neighbour in 1962, accuses China of large scale construction of military infrastructure on its frontiers.
    "A great deal of mining and dams are in Tibet now," the Buddhist monk, who resides in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh, said in an interview in New Delhi.
    "Whatever happens to the Tibetan environment will definitely impact its neighbours and also eventually all of Asia," Trinley said through an interpreter.
    "India has the deepest connect with Tibet and I would hope for a more clear expression of concern for the Tibetan environment from India," the spiritual leader added.
    Trinley said he was in the national capital to educate "monks and nuns who live in monasteries in the Himalayan region" on environmental issues.
    Tibetans have long chafed at China's rule over the vast Tibetan plateau, accusing Beijing of curbing religious freedoms and eroding their culture and language.
    Trinley is recognised by both China and the Dalai Lama as the reincarnation of the Karmapa Lama, head of the Karma Kagyu lineage, one of Tibetan Buddhism's four major schools.
    Recent appearances with the Dalai Lama have fuelled speculation he is being groomed as the Nobel peace laureate's spiritual successor.


    Warnning: Do NOT Get Caught While Searching!!
    Your IP : - Country : - City:
    Your ISP TRACKS Your Online Activity! Hide your IP ADDRESS with a VPN!
    Before you searching always remember to change your IP adress to not be followed!
    PROTECT YOURSELF & SUPPORT US! Purchase a VPN Today!

older | 1 | .... | 13 | 14 | (Page 15) | 16 | 17 | .... | 86 | newer