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    Title: Four Immeasurables - kindness, compassion, joy and unselfish giving
    Artist: 17th Gyalwang Karmapa 
    Language: Chinese 



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  • 07/29/13--19:08: Karmapa Chenno



  • Title: Karmapa Chenno
    Artist: 17th Gyalwang Karmapa
    Language: Tibetan





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    6 March 2012



    India is the source of Buddhism in Tibet and most of the teachings were translated from Sanskrit and other Indian languages into Tibetan. So in order to honor that, at the beginning of every Tibetan Buddhist text, the title is first written in Sanskrit, followed by Tibetan. This is done in order to recollect where the dharma comes from and to appreciate that. At the time the texts were translated, there was usually a great pandit from India and a Tibetan translator working on them together. During the first period of translation, all the texts were translated in this way and edited by great masters. They took a tremendous amount of care in producing the texts. And during the later period, they also took a lot of care with translation by traveling to India and doing a lot of editing and correction.

      The Kangyur was not published at first. The teacher of Chim Jampel Yang (Tib.mchims 'jam-dpal dbyangs) made the first collection of the Kangyur and it was handwritten. Because it was kept in a shrine room called the Jam Lhakhang at Narthang Monastery, this edition later became famous as the Lhakang Kangyur (sometimes known as the Old Narthang Kangyur.). After some time in Tibet, the Kangyur Rinpoche was produced by xylograph or woodcarving in Jang, sponsored by the King of Jang. The main editor of the Jang Kangyur was the Sixth Shamarpa. Later on it was called the Lithang Kangyur, because the xylograph was stored in Lithang. The Jang Kangyur was the first Tibetan Kangyur published in Tibet and this occurred during the time of Emperor Yung Lo of the Ming Dynasty. Perhaps that was the first Tibetan Kangyur to be edited by some of the great masters of the Karma Kamtsang. The publication of the Kangyur has had a great deal of contribution from the great masters of the Karma Kamtsang.  

    As we said before, when we request the buddhas and bodhisattvas to turn the wheel of Dharma, if we have not taken care with the teachings they have already given, then to keep on requesting teachings from them is rather strange. If we do not practice what they have already taught and what they have not yet taught we ask them to teach, that is a little bit excessive. And generally, in regards to the Kangyur and Tengyur, we just put them between two end  boards, tie them up very well, and put them up in the shrine and lock it. Sometimes we act as if we do not have to read them, but only need to preserve them in the shrine as objects of worship. If that becomes the norm, then there is a danger that the dharma will be lost.  

    In Tibet early on, there was a tradition of teaching the sutras, but later on, the shastras, the commentaries by the great masters, were studied much more. And then the Tibetan masters wrote and taught commentaries and those became the principle textbooks that were studied. And thereby, gradually, the direct teachings of the Buddha were studied less and less. Of course the commentaries by the Tibetan masters are perhaps clearer and easier to understand, but the [works of the] Indian masters, and especially the direct teachings of the Buddha, are the main source so therefore they must be studied. It is good to delve into the commentaries and understand them, but if we do not study the Kangyur at all, it is very strange. So the shedras and monasteries must read, study, and become familiar with the direct teachings of the Buddha as a primary source. If they never even look at the direct teachings of the Buddha, it is not possible that they will understand them very well.

    As it was said by the great Drikungpa, "If the teachings are not based on the Kangyur, then it is the work of Mara." If the teachings are based merely on our teachers' experiences, it is possible in these degenerate times that some lamas might give teachings that are not really according to the teachings of the Buddha or the Kangyur, but are their own made-up instructions. It is quite possible for that to happen. If we could compare the teachings of our lamas with the direct teachings of the Buddha, then we would be able to understand whether their teachings are genuine or not. We would be able to authenticate them based on the Kangyur.

    So the Buddha said, "During the time of degeneration, I will appear as the letters (texts)." So all of these teachings are an emanation of the Buddha and we have to see them as objects of refuge. Since we have not experienced the truth of the path or the truth of nirvana, at this moment the teachings are the real guide or lamp that dispels the darkness.

    Thus we have a great opportunity to read [the Kangyur] now and in the future also. As far as the shedras are concerned, they should facilitate Kangyur study, examination, and research. For instance, when we talk about the Vinaya and are discussing the myriad Vinaya principles, such as whether the Gelongma ordination should be there or not, if we actually were to read the thirteen volumes of the Vinaya, then many of the things that are confusing to us would become very clear. What we don't understand will become clear, and that is what I want you all to keep in your heart. In essence, the Kangyur is the root of our dharma, the source of our teachings, and the true guide of what to do and what not to do. With this understanding, please recite the Kangyur.

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    Prajnaparamita: The Heart Sutra or Sutra of the Perfection of Transcendent Wisdom


    Thus have I heard. Once the Blessed One was dwelling in Rajagriha at Vulture Peak mountain, together with a great gathering of the sangha of monks and a great gathering of the sangha of bodhisattvas. At that time the Blessed One entered the samadhi that expresses the dharma called “profound illumination,” and at the same time noble Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva mahasattva, while practicing the profound prajnaparamita, saw in this way: he saw the five skandhas to be empty of nature.

    Then, through the power of the Buddha, venerable Shariputra said to noble Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva mahasattva, “How should a son or daughter of noble family train, who wishes to practice the profound prajnaparamita?”

    Addressed in this way, noble Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva mahasattva, said to venerable Shariputra, “O Shariputra, a son or daughter of noble family who wishes to practice the profound prajnaparamita should see in this way: seeing the five skandhas to be empty of nature. Form is emptiness; emptiness also is form. Emptiness is no other than form; form is no other than emptiness. In the same way, feeling, perception, formation, and consciousness are emptiness. Thus, Shariputra, all dharmas are emptiness. There are no characteristics. There is no birth and no cessation. There is no impurity and no purity. There is no decrease and no increase. Therefore, Shariputra, in emptiness, there is no form, no feeling, no perception, no formation, no consciousness; no eye, no ear, no nose, no tongue, no body, no mind; no appearance, no sound, no smell, no taste, no touch, no dharmas, no eye dhatu up to no mind dhatu, no dhatu of dharmas, no mind consciousness dhatu; no ignorance, no end of ignorance up to no old age and death, no end of old age and death; no suffering, no origin of suffering, no cessation of suffering, no path, no wisdom, no attainment, and no non-attainment. Therefore, Shariputra, since the bodhisattvas have no attainment, they abide by means of prajnaparamita.

    Since there is no obscuration of mind, there is no fear. They transcend falsity and attain complete nirvana. All the buddhas of the three times, by means of prajnaparamita, fully awaken to unsurpassable, true, complete enlightenment. Therefore, the great mantra of prajnaparamita, the mantra of great insight, the unsurpassed mantra, the unequaled mantra, the mantra that calms all suffering, should be known as truth, since there is no deception. The prajnaparamita mantra is said in this way:


    OM GATE GATE PARAGATE PARASAMGATE BODHI SVAHA
    Thus, Shariputra, the bodhisattva mahasattva should train in the profound prajnaparamita.

    Then the Blessed One arose from that samadhi and praised noble Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva mahasattva, saying, “Good, good, O son of noble family; thus it is, O son of noble family, thus it is. One should practice the profound prajnaparamita just as you have taught and all the tathagatas will rejoice.”

    When the Blessed One had said this, venerable Shariputra and noble Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva mahasattva, that whole assembly and the world with its gods, humans, asuras, and gandharvas rejoiced and praised the words of the Blessed One.




    Heart Sutra Mantra


    OM GATE GATE PARAGATE PARASAMGATE BODHI SVAHA



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    "Rainbow Path" explores the life of the first Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa, and shows different sites where he spent his life and left miraculous signs. 










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    August 3rd 2013 – Gyuto Monastery, Dharamsala
    Meeting today in Dharamsala, India, with a large group of foreign-born Tibetan children who is currently on Summer Camp Program, the Gyalwang Karmapa urged them to remember the difficulties faced by Tibetans living in Tibet.
    The group of about 60 students included young Tibetans born in Switzerland, Canada, United States, Ireland and France, who had travelled to India in order to learn about and experience more of their Tibetan cultural roots.
    “There are a lot of difficulties that the Tibetans who live in Tibet face, and the responsibility to remove or eliminate those difficulties falls upon all of us who live in foreign countries,” the Gyalwang Karmapa told the young students. “It’s a great responsibility that we have.”
    “For all of the Tibetans who live in free countries, who are scattered all over the world, for all of you it is your own individual responsibility. And this is something that you all have to know and understand for yourselves, before anyone else really tells you.”
    The Gyalwang Karmapa particularly encouraged the young students to learn the Tibetan language and to learn about Tibetan culture and traditions, advising them that this would be very beneficial.
    “Actually you are all from a very different environment, a very different place, living in the midst of other cultures, so to be able to learn Tibetan, to speak Tibetan, and to learn about Tibetan culture and traditions is from one way of looking a very difficult thing to do. It can put a lot of pressure on you. But I hope that all of you can take this pressure and transform it into courage.”
    Finally the Gyalwang Karmapa thanked the parents of the students who had sent their foreign-born Tibetan children to India in order to deepen their cultural roots.
    “For all of you parents who have taken the interest in Tibetan culture, and who have decided to send your children who are Tibetans to India in order to learn a little bit more about the situation and the culture in Tibet, and to learn the Tibetan language and also about Tibetan cultures and traditions – it is very good. It’s something that creates a strong impression and so this is a wonderful thing to do. I’d like to thank you all very much for it.”

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  • 08/06/13--20:07: The 2nd Karmapa's footprint
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  • 08/07/13--20:09: Dream


  • Title: Dream
    Artist: 17th Gyalwang Karmapa 
    Language: Chinese 


    HHK with Mingyur Rinpoche






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    2007-01-04

    Tegar Monastery, Bodhgaya






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    This Milarepa Play was performed in Bodh Gaya on the occasion on the 27th Kagyu Monlam and was performed on the night of New Year 2010. Under the guidance of HH Karmapa it was performed by the artists from TIPA Dharamsala.








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    8 August 2013, Main Temple, Tsuglagkhang – Dharamsala

    On a foggy monsoon morning the Gyalwang Karmapa presided over a special prayer service at the Main Temple in Dharamsala, organized by the Central Tibetan Administration. Several thousand locals braved the wet and misty conditions to fill the Main Temple, uniting in aspirations for the well-being of the Tibetan people. The day marked the two-year anniversary since Dr Lobsang Sangay took office as the first democratically elected Sikyong or Prime Minister, in an historic moment for the Tibetan people. The Gyalwang Karmapa was joined by Kirti Rinpoche, the Abbott of Namgyal Monastery, members of the Central Tibetan Administration, and local Tibetan residents and supporters.
    Later Gyalwang Karmapa paid short visit to Tibetan Library at Ghangchen Kyishong to study and refer books.




    http://kagyuoffice.org/gyalwang-karmapa-leads-prayers-at-main-temple/

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    TNN | Aug 11, 2013, 02.38 AM IST




    DHARAMSHALA: Addressing a large group offoreign-born Tibetan children who are currently on a summer camp programme to the hill town,GyalwangKarmapa on Saturday asked them to remember the difficulties faced by Tibetans living in Tibet.

    "There are a lot of difficulties that the Tibetans who live in Tibet face, and the responsibility to remove or eliminate those difficulties falls upon all of us who live in foreign countries," the GyalwangKarmapa told the young students.

    The Karmapa encouraged the young students to learn Tibetan language and to learn aboutTibetan culture and traditions. "Actually you are all from a very different environment, a very different place, living in the midst of other cultures, so to be able to learn Tibetan, to speak Tibetan, and to learn about Tibetan culture and traditions is from one way of looking a very difficult thing to do. It can put a lot of pressure on you. But I hope that all of you can take this pressure and transform it into courage" he said.



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    In Tibet 

    11th Situpa, HH, the 6th Ponlop Rinpoche


    Traveling in the Grand Encampment

    1940ies, HH Karmapa in Retreat during the practice of the Six Yogas of Naropa

    HH practicing the 6 Yogas

    The previous 16th Karmapa(at age 16)

    Karmapa and the 11th Tai Situ Rinpoche












    Rangjung Rigpe Dorje, His Holiness the Sixteenth Karmapa, and Pema Wangchuk Gyalpo, the Eleventh Tai Situpa, together with high ranking incarnate lamas from Palpung Monastery on the occasion of His Holiness the Sixteenth Karmapa's visit to Palpung Monastery in 1937


    In China 1954

    Karmapa with his teacher  Bo Gonkar Rinpoche in Peking 1953



    The destroyed  monastery in the 80ies.

    In the seventies in Asia


    With the Eminent Tulkus 1973 in Rumtek

    1973 in Rumtek

























    In Rumtek 1979




    In Rumtek 1973








    16th Karmapa performs Black Hat Crown Ceremony in Rumtek Monastery in 1978, Sikkim

    In the yard of Rumtek Monastery
    With HH the Dalai Lama 1975

    With HH the Dalai Lama 1975

    With Thrangu Ranpoche




    HH 16th Karmapa in Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling 1976

    On the roof of  Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery 1976


    With Lopen Tsechu Rinpoche and King Birendra 1976






    During the Empowerments at the inauguration of Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery 1976 





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    A Short Guru Yoga on the Root Lama Karmapa

    Above my head upon a lotus, the Sun and the Moon is the Root Lama Orgyen Vajradhaha.
    Dressed with ornaments, he holds vajra and bell and sits cross legged, Embodiment of all Lamas,
    Buddha Karmapa, manifest the accomplishments of Mahamudra I Embodiment of all Yidams,
    Supremely powerful vajra, grant the ordinary and ultimate accomplishments here and now !
    Embodiment of all Dharmapalas, Orgyen Vajradhara, grant the Four Activities, effortlessly and spontaneously!
    Embodiment of all, wish-fulfilling jewel, transfer the wonderful strength of your mind and aspiration.
    Grant the accomplishment of Buddhahood in this very life!
    Staying in the state in which the Lama’s mind and my mind are inseparable, I recite.
    Karmapa khyeno!  After the accumulation:
    The Lama dissolves into light and is inseparable with my mind.
    Through this merit, may all the beings swiftly achieve the Four Kayas!


    This short Guru Yoga of the Buddha Karmapa, a practice to receive his blessing and inspiration, was composed by the one who is called the Tulku of Tenga.





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    Jetsun Milarepa, Tibet’s most widely revered yogi. Drawn by His Holiness the Seventeenth Karmapa while writing the original
    script for his play, The Life of Milarepa




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    The 16 Elders:

    Chanted by Karma Kagyu Sangha Community 
    Melody Composed by the 17th Karmapa






    Prostrations and Offerings to the Sixteen Elders

    Composed by Mahapandita Shakyashri.




    In the middle of a ground as even as the palm of a hand,
    Decorated by jewels, trees, and lakes,
    Is a precious palace with four sides and four doors.
    Within it, on a lotus, sun, and moon seat,
    Is the protector of beings who compassionately places disciples,
    In this age of disputation, on the path to liberation.
    Buddha Shakyamuni and the great elders,
    I pray that you come to this place, accompanied by your entourages.
    All buddhas and bodhisattvas of the ten directions,
    And all sanghas of shravakas from the ten directions,
    Whose fire of wisdom dries up the ocean of kleshas,
    Who are a field of liberation and merit,
    I invite you so that you may receive my offerings.
    I pray that you come, since my offerings are for beings’ benefit.
    The Dharma of the Lion of the Shakyas,
    That protector of beings, rests in your hands.
    All you arhats, elders, you who open
    The precious vessel of the Buddha’s words,
    I invite you in order to spread the genuine Dharma.
    I pray that you come, since my offerings are for beings’ benefit.
    As appointed by Shakyamuni,
    You hold the victory banner of Dharma.
    Angaja, Ajita, Vanavasin, Kalika,
    Vajriputra, Bhadra, Kanakavatsa,
    Kanaka Bharadhvaja, Arya Bakula,
    Rahula, Chudapanthaka, Pindola Bharadhvaja,
    Mahapanthaka, Nagasena, Gopaka, and Abheda,
    I pray that you come, since my offerings are for beings’ benefit.
    Although your perfect relinquishment and pristine wisdom are like the Buddha’s,
    You take the form of shravakas for the sake of disciples.
    Your special activity is the protection of Dharma.
    Sixteen elders, come here and be seated.
    You protect the Dharma, particularly the sugata’s words.
    Sixteen elders, you have cast aside your own welfare.
    And remain in the jungle of samsara for the benefit of others.
    Come here through your commitment and compassion.
    Upasaka who has taken refuge and listens to words of truth,
    And all those who serve the Three Jewels,
    I invite you to this garden of precious merit.
    I pray that you come, since my offerings are for beings’ benefit.

    Peerless, the sight of you never satiates.
    You are beautiful and golden in color.
    You have one face, two hands, and are seated with crossed legs.
    I prostrate to you who press the earth and rest in meditation.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On great snow-covered Mount Kailash
    Is the arya elder Angaja,
    Surrounded by one thousand three hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold an incense pot and fan.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In the crystal forest on the rishis’ mountain
    Is the arya elder Ajita,
    Surrounded by a hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you whose two hands rest in meditation.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In the mountain cave of Seven Leaves
    Is the arya elder Vanavasin,
    Surrounded by one thousand four hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who point a threatening forefinger and hold a fan.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On Copper Island in Jambudvipa
    Is the arya elder Kalika,
    Surrounded by one thousand one hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold golden earrings.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On the island of Singhala
    Is the arya elder Vajriputra,
    Surrounded by one thousand arhats.
    I prostrate to you who point a threatening forefinger and hold a fan.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On an island in the River Yamuna
    Is the arya elder Bhadra,
    Surrounded by one thousand two hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who teach Dharma and rest in meditation.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In the holy land of Kashmir
    Is the arya elder Kanakavatsu,
    Surrounded by five hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold a jeweled lasso.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In Godaniya in the west
    Is the arya elder Kanaka Bharadhvaja,
    Surrounded by seven hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you whose two hands rest in meditation.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In Uttarakuru in the north
    Is the arya elder Bakula,
    Surrounded by nine hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you whose left hand holds a mongoose.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On the island of Priyangku
    Is the arya elder Rahula,
    Surrounded by one thousand one hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold a precious crown.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On Vulture Peak Mountain
    Is the arya elder Chudapanthaka,
    Surrounded by one thousand six hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you whose two hands rest in meditation.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In Purvavideha in the east
    Is the arya elder Pindola Bharadhvaja,
    Surrounded by a thousand arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold a volume and an alms bowl.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    In the abode of the thirty-three devas
    Is the arya elder Mahapanthaka,
    Surrounded by nine hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold a volume and teach Dharma.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On the king of mountains, Vipaliparshva,
    Is the arya elder Nagasena,
    Surrounded by one thousand two hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold a vase and a ringing staff.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On the king of mountains, Bihula,
    Is the arya elder Gopaka,
    Surrounded by one thousand four hundred arhats.
    I prostrate to you whose two hands hold a volume.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    On the king of mountains, Himalaya,
    Is the arya elder Abheda,
    Surrounded by a thousand arhats.
    I prostrate to you who hold a mahabodhi stupa.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    The arya upasaka Dharmata
    Has his hair bound in a topknot and carries texts.
    In front of him is Amitabha.
    I prostrate to you who hold a fan and vase.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.
    Armored with diligence, powerful,
    You protect the Buddhadharma
    In the east, south, west, and north.
    I prostrate to the four great kings.
    Grant your blessing so that the gurus live long
    And so that Dharma flourish.

    Arya arhats, emanations of the Buddha,
    You protect the Dharma for beings’ benefit.
    Sixteen elders, you are truly the Three Jewels.
    Grant your blessing that the Dharma long remain.
    Sixteen elders, you personify compassion.
    Your retinues have crossed the ocean of becoming and have no kleshas.
    All sixteen thousand four hundred of you:
    Grant your blessing that the Dharma long remain.
    May the ocean of merit become complete,
    The ocean of pristine wisdom become pure,
    And the ocean of qualities become perfect.
    May we transcend all that is mundane.
    Through the compassion of the buddhas and bodhisattvas of the three times,
    You retain the appearance of shravakas and, for as long as samsara lasts,
    Will protect the Dharma and benefit beings.
    May there be the auspiciousness of the great elders!





    PDF Download 


    Prostrations and Offerings to the Sixteen Elders(Tibetan & English)  

    十六羅漢禮供文(Tibetan & Chinese)





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